John Oliver on states' voter ID laws


#1

[Read the post]


#2

There are plenty of people in this country who sincerely feel the votes of minorities and the poor are not legitimate to begin with. There are people still sending emails back and forth claiming Obama was only elected due to massive voter fraud and promising free goodies to those people.


#3

Just beautiful. Voter ID laws like this are a declaration by those promoting them that their side winning is far more important than ideals like democracy.


#4

Watched it last night, and all I can say is: that poor woman who keeps trying to register!

In California, you fill out a form and mail it in. You don’t have to go to an office and show someone some arbitrary papers proving that you’re a person.

Why the hell does she need her husband’s death certificate? That makes absolutely NO sense.


#5

This is why I love my precinct. I had lost my DL and my passport had been water-damaged. I asked the poll-worker about mail-in/provisional ballots and he asked why. I told him my passport was damaged. He asked, “Is it legible?”

“Yeah, you can read the information, but I doubt I could travel with it.”

“Valid for travel and valid for voter ID are two different things. Bring it in and you can vote.”


#6

Surely, then, it’s not a largely black precinct?


#7

Nope. Hippy-dippy liberal precinct consisting mainly of old white people.


#8

Sounds like a real head-scratcher for conservatives in search of districts in which to suppress votes!


#9

I watched him last night, loved the voter ID part especially the ghost voting by people who are guarding the sanctity of voting. The most interesting part was the NZ politician who got hit in the face with a dildo, other than that being hilarious, there was only passing mention that politician was connected with the TPP, I wonder if that was all HBO would let him mention about the TPP (unless it was positive)?


#10

OMFG never heard of ghost voting before. That should be an impeachable action.


#11

I was once a precinct captain in OC, California. Besides me, there were a bunch of other people who seemed to be both angry and retired. All they kept asking were hypothetical scenarios in which could they keep a person from voting. Honestly, it was embarrassing.

Fortunately, the county representative always answered that they had to let any potential voter cast a provisional ballot and that the county would sort it out.


#12

Wait, I wasn’t angry and retired. I think I was happy and early thirties.


#13

the only thing that can stop a bad person with a ballot…


#14

There’s no easy way to watch the show without an HBO subscription, right? No Amazon Prime, no Netflix?


#15

The main bit’s always made available on Youtube, although the whole show isn’t.


#16

He has said more than once that he has complete editorial control over his show - HBO have no influence whatsoever. I think it’s true, considering some of the stuff he’s managed to ge through…


#17

Be nice if he did a piece on the Democrats’ Super Delegates.

I’ve been excited for months, and totally forgot about them until Larry Wilmore reminded us.

If Hilary wants to do ‘one’ little progressive thing, and then she can go back to bank-n-business huggin, she could demand precisely half of all the Super Delegates vote for Bernie, and let the popular vote decide.

And congratulations on your nomination, Hilary. :disappointed:


#18

GerryMander to the rescue!


#19

The problem is that if you point out the findings of a legitimate study on how non-existent voter fraud really is, voter ID advocates will still believe to their deepest core that some sort of fraud is happening because they just can’t believe that the majority of people out there don’t think the same way they do. Any election that isn’t decided in favor of their preferred candidates must be proof that something hinky is going on.


#20

The super delegate issue is a bit confusing, but there was some general good intention behind its original implementation. It is designed as measure to prevent the rise of future Huey Longs or Donald Trumps in the Democrat candidacy, or just general milquetoast candidates that have little to no hope against a major republican contender, but somehow are popular enough to win the primaries.

That said, it’s interesting that such “discretion” wasn’t applied to Michael Dukakis back in the day, or that someone like Bernie Sanders is being approached as fearfully as a Trump by the DNC.

Representative democracy kind of sucks sometimes, and more so since we are ostensibly trapped in a two party system with no run-off elections…though contingent voting (ranking your preferences) would be my choice.