Misplaced decimal point gives extra £40,000 to worker, who spends it


#1

[Read the post]


#2

it was an honest mistake, he thought the orders of magnitude more was a compensation for the pound impairment


#3

Or is it scheduled for July, 2500?


#4

What happened to “Bank error in your favor, collect X”?


#5

Sentencing? This was already decided in Community Chest v Bank of Monopoly (1935).


#6

Jinx!!


#7

Speaking from my experience in the finance world in general, and banking specifically, what stood out to me was the fact that his “regular direct deposit” wages were apparently entered by hand each time.

There needs to be some scrutiny in how that company is doing payroll.

  • This is probably not the only entry error ever made;
  • Why is a “director of the company” entering payroll at all, let alone manually each time?;
  • The byzantine setup suggests incompetence in the bookkeeping/accounting of the entire company.

#8

So, if you accidentally overpay this company, who gets jailed?


#9

This is one of my favourite news stories of recent years:
the NZ couple who went on the lam with the bank’s millions
(as Principal Skinner says, “I’m a small man in many ways.”)

They got caught, of course. Still a ton of money missing though, apparently.


#10

Could be other sources of error, but I like this theory, if nothing else, then for the sheer bizarro world feel of having people sitting and punching these things in manually, every month, to every single employee, everywhere… that’s gotta be a fair amount of typing.


#11

The man who did this is a genius. He’ll lay low. We’ll never catch him!

http://www.imcdb.org/i282918.jpg

*Is the Superman 3 reference too obscure?


#12

Seriously, how do people charge somebody with theft of money which they deposited in that person’s bank account? They neither defrauded nor took anything from anyone.


#13

a lucky victim of cybercrime

That’s not how cybercrime works.


#14

Exactly! What crime was he charged with? If the reverse mistake were to occur whereby he received less than he was owed, would the bank be charged with a crime?


#15

Construction worker Steven Burke.


#16


#17

Don’t be silly, everyone knows banks can’t be charged with crimes.


#18

If they refused to correct the error, perhaps on the basis that they’d already spent the money on shareholder dividends, then there would be some penalty. It probably wouldn’t result in criminal proceedings, though, unless there was a culpable individual involved at some point in the process.


#19

Yes, It is.


#20

“FINALLY! That Nigerian Prince came through!”