Myspace lost all the music its users uploaded between 2003 and 2015

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2019/03/17/facebook-is-next.html

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People still use myspace?

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Cory, I’m a really big fan, but please…

" The Internet Archive will host anything freely distributable, for free, forever"

Next you’re going to tell me you’ve invented a perpetual motion machine.

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Followed closely by a platform recommendation.

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Nooooo it’s truee. My friend’s jar jar blinks music is no more. Boooooooo

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If your data isn’t under your control, ti’s not really your data. Now that storage has gotten dirt cheap, there is little excuse for not having a several terabyte solid state drive to stash your files on.

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two’s a crowd on my cloud, baby

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People still use cloud-based services?

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Maybe Myspace should rename itself as DidYouReallyThinkThisWasYourSpace?

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I just write “bomb plot kill president” on everything I create, and the NSA indexes and archives it for me, forever, for free.

Of course, retrieval requires a FOIA request, which makes it a bit slower than Amazon Glacier and rather less reliable, but hey, you can’t beat free.

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It did take three years for anyone to notice.

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I’d occasionally use it to listen to defunct local bands that never released anything official. When it stopped working I just assumed that my chrome plugins were probably doing something to piss it off, or that someone from the band had taken their songs down.

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You forgot to warn people about platforms removing content on purpose, e.g. because they suddenly find it politically expedient, e.g. Tumblr’s sudden ban on “adult” content…

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Someday, this will happen to Facebook, Instagram

Citation needed. While too many large-ish sites do lack any kind of coherent backup/restore strategy, others have multiple levels of backup such that nothing short of a coordinated physical attack at many locations simultaneously would cause loss of data. Some of them face the exact opposite problem, of having such comprehensive systems to preserve data that deleting it on purpose can be quite difficult.

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That’s not really any safer than trusting it to a cloud platform. Unless you have multiple backups in multiple geographic locations. And to be safe, you need to archive the software that encodes and decodes the files, and preserve the hardware it runs on, and make sure that hardware is airgapped.

I have boxes of digital tapes and disks from the 90s that I’m fairly certain I’ll never be able to extract any data from…

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Unless you ask them not to. (Either with a robots.txt that erases the entire history of any archived site, or by asking them in writing.)

I know this because I’ve asked them to memory hole some old sites I used to run in the mid 1990s but didn’t own the domains anymore (and couldn’t robots.txt them) and they were happy to oblige.

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This has always struck me as a questionable policy. A nefarious actor could destroy an important part of the archive if they gain control of a domain relatively briefly, or a domain could change hands and the new owners could unwittingly or indifferently erase the old owner’s archive with a robots.txt change.

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So much this. There have been sites that I loved that went away that got memory holed after exactly this. I had an uphill battle because I no longer owned the domains in question but they still did it after I could prove my prior ownership.

Their policy should have some safety nets here because it’s just too easy to game it. And once the content is gone from the archive, it’s gone forever.

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Except SSD offline longevity is largely unknown and based on some research appears to be worse than standard HDD. It’s well known that leaving a HDD sitting on the shelf is not a good long-term storage option. They fail to start back up and/or bit rot destroys the data.

If you want proven secure long term offline storage LTO is the most reliable technology at this point in time. When I worked in data centers even though massive fiber channel drive arrays were king we still had quite a few robotic tape libraries for real backup.

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