New guesses at MH370's location, mapped


#1

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#2

Thought. There’s a lot of satellite imagery of the seas from the time of crash. I think there was some crowdsourced attempt of search.

Could the images from then be coupled with the data from now, and look at them again?


#3

I think they don’t know exactly when the crash was, and a splash would only be evident for a few minutes.

That’s a hell of a haystack.


#4

The splash vanishes quickly. The floating debris lasts for days to weeks.


#5

Good point.


#6

Yeah but the flaperon would probably have floated mostly submerged, and so little debris has been found that the aircraft must have sunk almost intact.,


#7

There’s a lot of bright-colored debris in the hull. If it disintegrated at least somewhat, which the fragments suggest, there should be a patch, albeit short-lived, of stuff on the sea. Many things float poorly but many float pretty well (and get dispersed quickly by wind).


#8

In addition to a phylogenetic study of the barnacles, I wonder if their stable isotopic ratios could be studied to identify where the scant debris was colonized; presumably this would have happened shortly after the plane crashed. I think barnacles can be aged too, so looking at the total diversity of barnacles and their age structure might provide some insight.


#9

Maybe this will help. . .
The driving force for densification is the change in free energy from the decrease in surface area and lowering of the surface free energy by the replacement of solid-vapor interfaces.


#10

Maybe this will help. . .
The driving force for densification is the change in free energy from the decrease in surface area and lowering of the surface free energy by the replacement of solid-vapor interfaces.

You posted this in the wrong thread. It is more germane to the Weirdest Border Enclave
story.


#11

This needs a map.

Location of Réunion


#12

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