Norwegian news site makes readers pass test proving they read the post before commenting on it


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/03/02/norwegian-news-site-makes-read.html


#2

Oh shit, that would never fly in the good ole"USA, never.


#3

Seems like a great idea!

I assume. I didn’t read the article.


#4

The one salient feature of towering Anglo rage buttnamis is that they must not take any actual effort.


What is your Band Name, Rapper Name, Album Name
#5

I like the idea. It’d be fun to put this on youtube comments, at least.


#6

Norwegians have great fish, potatoes, moose and reindeer meat as well as berries and many other fresh products from the mountains and the sea. However, on a Friday evening, the big night for eating something special with friends and family, they will prefer eating beans and corn from a can and minced meat; calling it tacos.

Wait, what test?

From: “Weird things Norwegians do” afroginthefjord.com Even a simple ‘click this button after reading’ similar to online license agreements would suffice.


#7

Boingboing should start a pilot test of this


#8

TV; DW (too video, didn’t watch)


#9

Preaching to the choir. We don’t spout off nearly as much as people on other sites.


#10

FAKE NEWS holy cow wat a jerk

That’s total and complete bullshit and you’re an evil bastard. THE FROGS! THE FROGS ARE COMING FOR YOUR CHILDREN!!! and the chemtrails, too

:wink:

Just this morning on Twitter, after I’d retweeted a NYT article about Sessions’ perjuring himself, I got a reply from @AnecbotalNYT that intrigued me. The bot finds forum comments from the NYT site/story that are actually somewhat useful (that is, they’re not a YT rage-screed) and devoid of insults and that sort of thing, and then replies to the RTer (in this case, me) with that comment:

Pretty interesting setup is linked from the bot’s bio info:

**The Challenge**

Online news outlets often suffer from a dearth of civility and quality in the discussions that emerge in news comments. Incivility can further polarize people’s beliefs on issues. But there are high quality comments that are made too. Research shows that by curating and highlighting such high quality comments it can signal norms and expectations for comment discourse. This can improve the long term quality and viability of online discussion around important civic issues.

The Project
The CommentIQ project is about making it easier for community managers and moderators in a range of news organizations to quickly identify high quality comments that they can highlight on their sites. We are examining a range of automatically computed scores that can help identify the good stuff from the not-so-good stuff.

http://comment-iq.com/


#11

Let’s do it anyway, quizzes are fun!


#12

WROOOOOOOOOONG!!!
SAAAAAAAADDDDDD!!!

:stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


#13

Make sure the test includes defining censorship, A lot of people think it means any muting of any speech when it can only be censorship of the government does it.


#14
  • I looked through the article, and it’s a great idea!
  • I looked through the article, and it’s a horrible idea!
  • I didn’t look at the article, and it’s a great idea!
  • I didn’t look at the article, and it’s a horrible idea!
  • What article? I’m just here to be snarky!
  • What article? I’m just here to troll!

0 voters


#15

False. None of these options are about Benghazi.


#16

Well we have to start somewhere. What better place than right here? What better time than right now?


#17

Oblig.:


#18

What about companies (or individuals) using copyright, trademark, defamation or contract law to shut down criticism?


#19

Thats what I like about Boing boing. The articles are so short I only need to glance at them before opinionating.


#20

I didn’t read the content of this post or follow any links but it sounds like a great idea!