Nova Scotia abandons its attempt to destroy a teenager who stumbled on a wide-open directory of sensitive information


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/05/08/squid-jiggin.html


#2

When society becomes all about covering one’s ass to the fullest extent, to the exclusion of reason, I submit that society is fucked.


#3

Considering how some search bots try every single doorknob, I’d be surprised if someone hasn’t spidered it.


#4

Both Halifax Regional Police Supt. Perrin and Premier McNeil are riding the asshat train. Makes me a little less proud to be Canadian.


#5

LOL, sounds like this place I used to work that had many things just saved to open network folders. All the contents were available to everyone on the network.


#6

The police say that if they had it to do over again, the wouldn’t change a thing.

A universal po po sentiment these days.


#7

Perrin said the complaint came from someone at the security level of the provincial government. He said it was reported that a website was compromised and personal information was taken.

So, are they looking into charging whoever it was that created the false police report?


#8

“All kids love log” <giggle> did you write that interface?


#9

So the gov’t was smart enough to track when a doc was downloaded but not that it was open to the internet. Someone needs to be charged but not the kid.


#10

Well, yes. (I still have to finish the nuke button.)

And if you’re wondering about the couch icon for one of the crawlers, it’s because I’m SOFA KING tired of Semrush. It ignores several robots.txt disallows, and is five days into ignoring a total exclusion. It’s a company with a business model of providing negative benefit to the sites it scans.


#11

That’s about the point where I whip out the targeting console for the banhammer 40MT and firewall their IP address (and possibly netblock!) from my gear.


#12

I have the /24 that they do their scanning from 403’d, leaving them another address to check robots.txt from. They say that a robots exclusion can take up to two weeks to take effect. Uh-huh, sure.


#13

nods I’m a little more… aggressive, at least if I’m hosting the server- no need for a hosts.deny file when the firewall is dropping their packets at the border… snickers


#14

Ignorance isn’t an excuse. It’s a damn shame this hacking thug isn’t facing any punishment for his terrorist acts.


#15

Clicked on the user name to check re Poe’s Law, no sarcasm here.

Hey Philip, you want any salt on this bag of dicks?


#16

The police responded the way they did because they were lied to by the government employees who discovered the hack. They also lack the requisite knowledge to determine whether a crime had actually been committed, so when the call came in–“Sgt. Murphy! There’s been a hackin’ down to the government!”–they responded the only way they know how, which is to say they ran around with their hair on fire. There is an excellent piece about this whole ordeal by Tim Bosquet at the Halifax Examiner that is a must-read for anyone who worries about government ignorance of the interwebs, as well as how authority figures will flat-out lie to cover their own asses. He lays bare a number of other issues too, such as how the police somehow managed to immediately get a list of all this kid’s neighbors and search their backgrounds for anyone who might be “good at computers”.


#17

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