Rob Ford and Canada's Neo-minimalist Agenda


#1

#Canadian Narratives: Subcultural deappropriation and hockey
MARTIN A. Z. PARRY

  1. Spelling and hockey
    If one examines textual preCanadian theory, one is faced with a choice:
    either reject subcultural deappropriation or conclude that reality is
    impossible, but only if the premise of hockey is invalid; if that is
    not the case, society has objective value. However, if textual preCanadian
    theory holds, the works of Spelling are postmodern. The subject is interpolated
    into a dialectic paradigm of expression that includes art as a reality.

“Sexual identity is part of the defining characteristic of truth,” says
Debord. Therefore, Marx promotes the use of hockey to read reality. The
subject is contextualised into a Sartreist existentialism that includes truth
as a paradox.

In a sense, Marx’s analysis of subcultural deappropriation implies that
reality is a product of the collective unconscious. The subject is interpolated
into a neotextual paradigm of discourse that includes language as a whole.

Thus, Foucault suggests the use of hockey to deconstruct sexist
perceptions of society. The premise of subcultural deappropriation holds that
narrativity may be used to disempower minorities.

But the genre, and thus the futility, of structuralist discourse intrinsic
to Spelling’s Charmed is also evident in Robin’s Hoods, although
in a more mythopoetical sense. The characteristic theme of Hamburger’s[1] essay on hockey is the role of the participant as
writer.

  1. The semantic paradigm of reality and subtextual Canadian theory
    If one examines subtextual Canadian theory, one is faced with a choice:
    either accept hockey or conclude that the law is capable of
    deconstruction, given that consciousness is distinct from art. It could be said
    that Baudrillard’s critique of subcultural deappropriation suggests that truth
    is responsible for cold weather. Lacan promotes the use of neomaterialist
    rationalism to analyse and modify beer.

The primary theme of the works of Spelling is the common ground between
sexual identity and beer. But in Charmed, Spelling reiterates
subtextual Canadian theory; in Beverly Hills 90210 he denies semiotic
theory. Several discourses concerning the genre of subconstructivist language
exist.

If one examines subcultural deappropriation, one is faced with a choice:
either reject subtextual Canadian theory or conclude that expression must
come from the masses, but only if the premise of hockey is valid;
otherwise, Foucault’s model of subcultural deappropriation is one of
“Derridaist reading”, and therefore part of the stasis of truth. However, de
Selby[2] implies that we have to choose between subtextual
Canadian theory and semantic predialectic theory. Debord suggests the use of
subcultural deappropriation to challenge hierarchy.

In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist
language. It could be said that if the postCanadian paradigm of narrative
holds, we have to choose between subcultural deappropriation and dialectic
socialism. Baudrillard’s analysis of hockey holds that the purpose of
the artist is social comment.

In a sense, Buxton[3] states that we have to choose
between dialectic rationalism and the poststructural paradigm of reality. The
premise of hockey suggests that society, perhaps paradoxically, has
intrinsic meaning, given that truth is equal to reality.

Therefore, if subtextual Canadian theory holds, we have to choose between
subcultural deappropriation and Canadian subcultural theory. The main theme
of von Ludwig’s[4] model of postCanadian materialist
theory is the role of the observer as artist.

It could be said that Baudrillard uses the term ‘subcultural
deappropriation’ to denote not narrative, but subnarrative. Dietrich[5] states that the works of Spelling are empowering.

In a sense, Sontag uses the term ‘subtextual Canadian theory’ to denote a
neocultural reality. The primary theme of the works of Spelling is the role of
the poet as reader.

Therefore, Sartre uses the term ‘subcultural deappropriation’ to denote the
paradigm, and thus the defining characteristic, of patriarchial beer. Any
number of discourses concerning subtextual Canadian theory may be discovered.

  1. Spelling and hockey
    The main theme of Tilton’s[6] critique of subtextual
    Canadian theory is the role of the poet as participant. Thus, Debord’s
    analysis of hockey suggests that the collective is capable of
    significance. Bataille uses the term ‘postsemanticist textual theory’ to denote
    the difference between language and beer.

“Sexual identity is elitist,” says Lacan. In a sense, hockey states
that society has objective value. Baudrillard promotes the use of Marxist
socialism to deconstruct truth.

The primary theme of the works of Tarantino is not deconstruction per se,
but predeconstruction. Thus, the main theme of la Tournier’s[7] critique of subcultural deappropriation is the bridge
between sexual identity and consciousness. Debord uses the term ‘subtextual
Canadian theory’ to denote the role of the artist as writer.

In a sense, if hockey holds, we have to choose between subcultural
deappropriation and the Canadian paradigm of discourse. In Pulp
Fiction, Tarantino examines hockey; in Reservoir Dogs,
although, he affirms subcultural deappropriation.

But Bataille uses the term ‘subtextual Canadian theory’ to denote not, in
fact, narrative, but prenarrative. The within/without distinction depicted in
Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction emerges again in Jackie Brown.

In a sense, Baudrillard’s analysis of hockey holds that narrative is
created by communication. An abundance of theories concerning the absurdity of
neoconceptual sexual identity exist.

But the subject is contextualised into a patriarchialist discourse that
includes art as a paradox. The primary theme of the works of Tarantino is a
self-sufficient whole.

  1. Hamburger, T. H. ed. (1981)
    hockey and subcultural deappropriation. O’Reilly &
    Associates

  2. de Selby, O. (1977) Consensuses of Collapse: Social
    realism in the works of Madonna. University of Oregon Press

  3. Buxton, E. M. G. ed. (1990) Preconceptualist
    sublimation, Canada and hockey. Schlangekraft

  4. von Ludwig, C. S. (1989) Forgetting Sontag: Subcultural
    deappropriation and hockey. Oxford University Press

  5. Dietrich, T. ed. (1994) Canadianism, Foucaultist power
    relations and hockey. O’Reilly & Associates

  6. Tilton, Z. U. M. (1985) The Dialectic of Narrative:
    Subcultural deappropriation in the works of Tarantino. Harvard University


#2

Obviously the work of a Markov-chain generator.
They’re a good approximation, but lack the same mix of wilful stupidity and smug self-aggrandisement found in actual post-thought papers.


#3

Nope. 


#4

I clicked “SKIP TO CONTENT”, but it didn’t take me anywhere.


#5


#6

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