Science FTW

This idea must have been proposed at least every other decade since the 1950ies (if not earlier) to solve this or enable that.

TeHrz2
And Matt Groening is free to steal ideas from himself as long as the result is still funny.

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researchers attached tiny sensors to moths and dragonflies… to study in detail how dragonflies will circle endlessly around light sources, positioning themselves with their backs facing the beams. They also documented that some insects will flip upside down in the presence of lights that shine straight upward

Insect flight was least disrupted by bright lights that shine straight downward, the researchers found.

“For millions of years, insects oriented themselves by sensing that the sky is light, the ground is dark” — until people invented artificial lights, said Avalon Owens, a Harvard entomologist who was not involved in the research.

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cross-posted from Good Encouraging Stuff Part 2

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Physicians and scientists have long known that (1) women get more autoimmune diseases than men; (2) dosage compensation for the second X chromosome in female cells likely played some role in that; (3) RNA-protein complexes are often targeted by autoantibodies; and (4) Xist is part of an RNA-protein complex involved in X inactivation. Yet no one had ever looked to see if Xist itself might underlie the greater propensity of women to develop autoimmune diseases. Finally, someone put all these logical pieces together and found out that it does. Hopefully, this research will reveal some new and effective targets for the diagnosis, monitoring, stratification, and treatment of this suite of diseases.

Single paper, mouse subjects, further study needed, all the usual caveats, but having a target to look at may improve outlook for managing autoimmune disease far better than “yeah, it really sucks to have XX chromosomes, right?”

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I’m pleased anyone is doing this research. It’s been a low low priority for a long time.

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“This time, we’re definitely going to punch a hole in the fabric of space-time.”

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coincidentally, i listened to that episode last night. it was so good!

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In September 2023, Inna Zakharevich of Cornell University and Thomas Hull of Franklin & Marshall College showed that anything that can be computed can be computed by folding paper. They proved that origami is “Turing complete” — meaning that, like a Turing machine, it can solve any tractable computational problem, given enough time.

https://www.quantamagazine.org/how-to-build-an-origami-computer-20240130/

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Now I can start planning that trip to Australia.

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Now I can stick my hand in that hole by that big oak.

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Be sure to hug that platypus tight.

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Well good news, it may be that scientific breakthroughs aren’t actually slowing.

A new pre-press paper on arXiv reanalyzes the data used by the widely covered Nature paper claiming the decline and finds it was caused by a host of errors from erroneous data to a bug in the visualization software used in the original paper.

Their conclusion: the curves that supposedly show declining disruption of scientific and technological work instead trace how metadata quality has increased over time.

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More tech rentiers is good news?

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Why do you hate the free market, Kathy! WHY?!? /s

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No? Science not slowing is the good news.

Also science catching errors in science, FTW.

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