Scientist model brain wrinkles with gel in a glass jar


#1

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#2

Three cheers for self-organization!


#3

Looks delicious!


#4

Interesting. My youngest was sliced and diced for medical research at 5 days old. They wanted a control subject for a study of brain development. I’ve got the NMR scans of her.

What happens is that at 20 weeks or earlier the brain is smooth and then crinkles. The researchers want to see if there are any differences with development of premature babies.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_nR4AGFSHkoWVNGcmI5LXY3Qy1nVWo4UUVYQWNkWWtoNUZR/view?usp=sharing

Very muppet

Hope the link works.

She gets scanned again at 2.


#5

I’ve heard that intelligence is related to the amount of crenellations in a brain (probably a gross oversimplification)… Is a neuroscientist available to theorize as to what this process could imply with respect to intelligence?


#6

Of course they’re available. Here’s a recent theory:


#7

This seems quite a lot like what happens to your fingertips when they’re immersed in water for an extended period of time.


#8

I… what?

Is this one of those “nonsequitur; your argument is invalid” things?


#9

I recently read (though apparently it’s been known for decades) that people with nerve damage to the hands won’t get wrinkled fingers when their hand is submerged in water.


#10

I looked into that theory… It’s full of $#!+


#11

That was a hard headline to parse.

If gel wrinkles brains in glass jars, why would you waste a model scientist one to find this out?

Just keep some disposable spares handy for your mad science experiments.


#12

You’re a zombie!


#13

Or the coffee didn’t kick in yet.


#14

I pictured the model scientist’s brain enjoying itself wrinkling, just to pass the time, alongside some gel in a jar.

Y’know—like brains do.


#15

I’m just saying that a neurosurgeon was available (maybe he still is? New suits and all!), and he had lots of intelligence, but maybe not in the things that could help illuminate your issue.

tl;dr vacuous non sequitur


#16

Ah. Went over my head.

Ironically, the hope was, an expert could chip in before I waded too deep into neuroanatomy, the way Carson waded into archaeology.

Alas! The experts are probably busy saving lives and stuff…


#17

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