Spaaaaace

NASA is sending two small hand-luggage suitcase-sized spacecraft to study binary asteroids in 2022

NASA is splashing $55m on a new space mission to send two small camera-carrying spacecraft to study a type of an object in our Solar System that has yet to be observed in detail: binary asteroids.

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NASA puts an Astrobee to work sweeping the ISS. Yep, floating cube good at taking pics and hanging around…

NASA has conjured imaginings of an orbital Roomba after boasting of a “sweep” of the ISS interior by an Astrobee robot as hardworking 'nauts keep the outpost up and running.

Sadly, the “sweep” in question was merely a potter around the interior of the aging space station for inspection and documentation purposes while NASA’s Chris Cassidy and Russian Cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner beavered away at keeping things operational.

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Honestly, at $55M that seems like a real bargain!
So cool!

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Astroboffins reckon evidence of Martian life has probably been destroyed where liquid acid flowed on the Red Planet

Evidence of ancient microbial life in Martian soil will not be easy to find, and some of it may have been destroyed by the flow of liquid acid, according to research published in Scientific Reports.

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Research into deflecting potentially world-destroying asteroids is apparently not a ‘national priority’ for the UK

The European Space Agency (ESA) has let people know where €129.4m of work for its Hera mission will go. The UK is, unsurprisingly, not on the list.

One down, two to go: Astra’s first attempt to reach orbit scuppered by iffy guidance

Now down to four functioning instruments, Voyager 1 is expected to reach the Oort cloud in approximately 300 years. It fired up its trajectory correction thrusters for the first time in decades in 2017 to keep its antenna pointed toward Earth, adding a few more years to its mission.

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75,000 light seconds, or 20.75 light hours away.

We will never travel to the stars.

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You and I certainly never will. Some distant descendant of ours, probably not recognizable as a modern-day human, and very likely blurring the lines between a machine and a living being, though? Entirely possible.

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We’re not getting back with Galileo, UK govt tells The Reg, as question marks sprout above its BS*

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Space. The final frontier. These are the voyages of ‘Advanced Night Repair’ skin cream helping NASA to commercialise space

Space. The final frontier. These are the voyages of “Advanced Night Repair” skin serum and the suitable-for-zero-G “CosmoSkin” cosmetics-in-space project.

No, The Register has not set its calendars to April 1st – this stuff is real.

Cosmetics house Estée Lauder last Friday announced that “the brand’s iconic Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Multi-Recovery Complex will launch into space” by hitching a ride on the next resupply mission to the international space station.

The face-saving goop, which Amazon stocks at $186 for 100 millilitres certainly sounds worthy of a trip to the ISS, given that Estée Lauder says it has recently been infused with “Chronolux™ Power Signal Technology”.

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