Steve Reich-ian iPhone ringtone composition


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/03/07/steve-reich-ian-iphone-rington.html


#2

Nicely done, and yes it’s parody. They used an app to achieve this, not the regular ringer?


#3

The way things are going I would rather have a Robert Reich ringtone.


#4

Fantastic. Parody? Hommage?

It’s Reich’s technique used on a piece of music (mallet based) reminiscent of the materials he worked on with his phase musics.

There is a lovely simple IOS app from Third Coast Percussion which I heartily recommend

Though yes you can get the effects with, say Abletonm but this is fantastic.

This, however, is a parody. And a wonderful one. Glad it’s still up on the web.


#5

Misandry!


#6

He deserved it!!


#7

i wanted to like this so bad that i opened a shit ton of tabs. still can’t stand the ringtone. funny tho!


#8

Pretty cool! But a lot easier now in the day of the tape recorder . . . One problem is that I couldn’t detect any comb filter or phasing effect in the tones, only in the timing of the mallet hits. Maybe because the notes are so short. You can definitely hear the phasing effect in Come Out.

Here’s a dance to Come Out. Really blew me away.


#9

Love this. One of my favorite Reich pieces is Music for Pieces of Wood. The ability of the performers to stay on their individual rhythm is amazing. There’s a nice recording of it from 1984 on YouTube:


#10

Lee Marvin looks so tough that, if Angie Dickinson had though to punch him in the nuts, it would probably have sounded like hitting a sack of gravel.

@Jerry_Vandesic, I really enjoyed that; despite having the feeling throughout that it was about to break in “Soul Limbo”, the theme from Testmatch Tuesday. The variety of sizes, shapes and styles of dress among the performers added to my enjoyment, as did the frisson caused by the proximity of so many fingers to so so many beating sticks. I wonder if it was enjoyable for the performers.


#11

When I finally got to see a live performance of Reich’s iconic “Music for 18 Musicians,” it was interesting to see how the constant rhythm was maintained over the length of the piece. There’s a shaker and a piano that maintain a constant, unchanging pulse throughout – the musicians worked in shifts. After a stretch of time would go by a new musician would step up and start the shaker alongside the first musician. Then the first musician could retire to whatever hallucinatory realm you go to after being clockwork for so long. Minimalism is harder than it looks.


#12

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