Strong wind slams a car door shut, and it locks with toddler inside. Mother then gets a ticket for child abuse by neglect


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/06/19/strong-wind-slams-a-car-door-s.html


#2

Must I again make a mocking dispersion reference to the average IQ of a Police Person…

Apparently so.


#3

This could be a Geiko commercial - when you call the cops, you have to know somebody is going to get a ticket or somebody is going to get shot. It’s what they do.


#4

I once accidentally locked my daughter in the car at the airport. The reaction of the police officer and all of the others who came to help could not have been any more kind and generous.


#5

From the article:

"We make decisions in the moment with all the information we have available,’’ she said. “This can be a super dangerous situation. People die in these circumstances.”

Let’s just ponder these words for a moment.

I assume she didn’t mean to speak the unvarnished truth about police culture.


#6

Not in wealthy suburbs. At least from what I’ve seen. Or at least wealthy neighborhoods.


#7

My mom and I were discussing how intense it’s become the other day. With four boys in the 70s, she was AMAZED that child services had never been called.

Let’s count off the injuries…front teeth bit through bottom lip, dislocated elbow, black eye on the corner of the hearth, big toenail torn off, broken glasses in eye from bb pellet (no, he didn’t shoot his eye out), twelve stitches in forehead from stair landing, shrapnel in arm from soda bottle bomb, fingertip injury from firecrackers, thumbnail shut in car door, burnt hand with HUGE blister from hot toaster, broken leg from treehouse fall…
There’s many more, but this is all I can think of at the moment.


#8

A little known fact about hiring requirements for police, TSA and similar positions is that the potential recruit must be diagnosed with M.A.D. major asshole disorder. Just so you know…


#9

Three boys and a girl, grew up in the 80’s and early 90’s.

3 broken arms, a broken leg, broken toe, broken finger
20something stitches (mostly in the head area, across 3 siblings)
Couple concussions
A couple visits for fish hooks in hands (ETA: I think once in the head too?)

Black eye, really? That doesn’t count, because you don’t go to the ER for that stuff. Gave my brother a mammoth of a bloody nose once, similarly handled in-house.

Let’s see… the sources of stitches:

falling off a stool
hitting in the head with a stick (2 times)
hit in the head with rock
running through a cave


#10

#11

What, that’s all they could manage between four of them? Wimps!


#12

I could almost understand if they needed to somehow put this nonoccurence (thanks for that one spellcheck!) through the proper channels, just for some good old-fashioned ass covering. Ideally, it would not have any impact on this person’s life, but would just be a quick cross-check for a pattern of neglect/abuse. But even even if a pattern were found, a FINE? That seems completely ridiculous. If the state believes that a couple hundred dollars is all that is between being a responsible vs. neglectful parent, we are truly fucked.


#13

I’m sure getting tickets from the local police for each one of these injuries would have SOLVED THE PROBLEM IMMEDIATELY. /s.


#14

From the original article it appears the family dicked around for over fifteen minutes before calling for help. I suspect that’s the reason for the ticket. Leaving a child in a sweltering hot car because you’re too cheap to break a window or too embarrassed to call for help counts as child abuse in my book.


#15

I’m no authoritarian but I do know that the police don’t judge guilt or innocence. They are required to issue citation anytime the conditions for a violation of the law have been met. It’s up to the judge to decide if the circumstances warrant punishment or not.


#16

Agreed, they don’t judge guilt or innocence, but that doesn’t mean that they have zero discretion. Police make decisions all the time as to whether charges are warranted. The risk they run in situations like this is that people don’t call for help. Though in this situation I think I would have avoided the police and called a tow truck driver, or just broke a window myself…


#17

After more than a decade of constantly reiterating “the police are your friends” to my child for his own safety I now have the unenviable task of deprogramming him because believing the police are your friend after age 15 (or younger if you belong to an at risk opressed minority) is tantamount to suicide or at the very least self incrimination.
Every interface with police no matter how small multiples your chance of very negative consequences.


#18

That’s a great way to look at it… that is if you can afford a lawyer and the time to litigate the matter. Also unintended consequences of now being in the cross hairs of child protective services


#19

Dicked around or panicked?


#20

that disorder makes them really butthurt.