Study: games and video-watching correlate with kids getting smarter, social media a wash

Originally published at: Study: games and video-watching correlate with kids getting smarter, social media a wash | Boing Boing

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Yes! Vindication!

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Social media is a game. Just without a story or a point.

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Media literacy is an more important thing to focus on than the usual new media hatefest that happens all the time.

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I’m reading a book about this.

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There’s a reason that the various purveyors of the big social media networks don’t let their kids get anywhere near their own product. Studies or not, they’ve always known their services are toxic.

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I just have to point out that the methods that the study used to measure intelligence were all computer-based, and some of them seem kinda game-like:

As is always the case with intelligence tests, the results may be as much a reflection on how good the subject is at taking tests as it is about the true intelligence of the subject, so being super practiced on using computers could be a factor.

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It wouldn’t surprise me if a number of people here don’t buy into IQ tests. Even if we considered them credible, the results here don’t seem especially significant. But let’s humor it for a moment anyway.

If there’s a true correlation, I’d argue that it’s not games leading to higher IQ but rather the reverse. Kids with higher IQs likely need additional stimulation that you can only find in an interactive medium. Games require puzzle solving, planning, timing, etc. (depending on the game, of course) whereas viewing something is incredible active and social media…is potentially more emotional stimulation, positive or negative, than anything else.

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I bet they get different results with adults.

(In faux Russian accent)

In social media, game plays you.

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If kids get genuine interactions then they develop better, huh?

*eyerolls in Gen X.

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There’s a story, it’s just not a very good one

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I was about to share this. They really shouldn’t just throw around the very vague term “intelligence” to pull together these very particular measures of particular types of activity. (Especially when it leads them to fall backwards into eugenicist talk with phrases like “genetic predisposition for intelligence!”)

Specificity in language, especially with research, is really important.

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