Tehran's police tell women that violations of religious dress codes will henceforth be treated as civil offenses, not criminal offenses


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/12/30/tinkering-in-the-margins.html


#2

That’s what passes for progress in a nation-state run by dour religious fundies for 40 years.

Good to see there’s still some pushback left after 2009.


#3

A move forward, but not much of a move.


#4

I can’t imagine how [badly] that could go wrong.


#5

Let me guess - not attending the class will result in a criminal prosecution?


#6

Oh wow, how kind of them to make jeans and a tshirt only an expensive civil offense instead of a criminal act. Boy, Iran has such great and fair leaders. Who could ask for more?


#7

Baby steps??


#8

Of course!

But I’m sure that the mandatory courses will be given by sensitive caring officers, and not power-tripping a-holes with a religious justification for misogyny and abuse against “loose” women. /s


#9

They are cutting off the internet in several of the cities affected by the protests.


This seems to be a big event, and not likely to be calmed by a slight easing of the dress code. protesters are chanting “Death to Khamenei” and “Death to Rouhani.”
https://twitter.com/hadinili/status/947141709724635137
https://twitter.com/farnazfassihi/status/947211401138929664/video/1


#10

…violators will instead be made to attend classes given by police.

Now I ask you, how bad could that possibly be?


#11

I need a volunteer from the class to help me demonstrate all of the ways showing some ankle corrupts our innocent young men. Fatima? How about you? For the purposes of this demonstration only, please remove your clothing so as not to restrict the view for others.

Good girl.


#12

Hurray?

I guess?


#13

What are protesters chanting?

Iranians have a knack for political slogans that rhyme in Persian as if they were verses of poetry.

Here are some slogans being chanted at the protests, translated into English:

“We don’t want an Islamic Republic, we don’t want it, we don’t want it.”
“They are using Islam as an excuse to drive people crazy.”
“Independence, Freedom, Iranian Republic.”
“Reformists, hard-liners, Game is over.”
“We are all Iranians, we don’t accept Arabs.”
“We are getting poor and clerics are driving fancy cars.”
“Reza Shah, Rest in Peace.”
“We will die but we will take Iran back.”
“Come out to the streets Iranians, shout for your rights.”
“Death to the Revolutionary Guards.”

I wish them success.

Source:


#14

Yay for another baby step.

By the way, is accompanying an article about police enforcement of dress codes in Tehran with a photo of women who go way beyond the mandatory religious dress code in Tehran some subtle attempt to get across a propaganda message? Or is it just an understandable mistake by a Westerner who sees all those excessively covered women as essentially the same?


#15

A quick image search on “Iranian women 1960’s” reveals what was before, and what I hope will be again.


#16

I think you are going to see more and more of it simply due to demographics. The generations born after the Islamic Revolution is not enamored with religious fundamentalism. It is the old guard for them. That is the majority of the population. We are looking at either the next “Arab Spring” or “Tienanmen Square” in the near future.


#17

This one seems less positive, somehow. (“Death to the Revolutionary Guards” seems a bit rough for me too, but then, I’m a wimp)


#18

“Reza Shah, rest in peace” caught my attention. Iranians may be coming to the conclusion that the worst day under the late Shah is better than the best day under Kh(o/a)menei.


#19

Wish I’d said this…

For 38 years Iranian crowds have been gathered by regime minders to chant “Death to America, Death to Israel.” When their chant spontaneously changes to “Down with Hezbollah” and “Death to the Dictator” as it has now, something big is happening.

http://www.tabletmag.com/scroll/252332/why-cant-the-american-media-cover-the-protests-in-iran


#20