The best elevator in Russia


#1

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#2

from the Redman school of electrical engineering

[@2:07 if the embed doesn’t skip ahead properly]


#3

The whole message reads:

To call the elevator
connect 2 conducting wires
(they’re 12V, not dangerous)

P.S. We’ll fix it when we can.
P.P.S. Please don’t rip [them] out.


#4

How do you say “I’ll take the stairs.” ?


#5

Not always the best choice either.


#6

“Button” is bourgeois affectation.

Socialist realism makes clear the underlying material culture of circuit for elevator signal.


#7

Why do I know this was from /r/aNormalDayInRussia ?


#8

I understand you use just the same technique to start other peoples’ cars over there.


#9

Surely by now all that stuff about “bourgeois affectation” and “socialist realism” has been replaced by “strong, manly True Russians have no need of effete Western affectations like buttons, clearly an invention by homosexuals meant to sap our potency.”


#10

A friend who lived in Nicaragua for a while said the way they boil water is to put two live wires in a big pot.


#11

From Finland. Ohmimakkara, “ohm sausage”.


Engineers are the same everywhere.


#12

They could have wired up a button in less time than it took to write the note.


#13

That assumes they have the button on hand.


#14

In Soviet Russia, elevator buttons you.


#15

Assuming you had a button :smile:

In Russia, assuming surplus and availability often isn’t valid, not even for small (elsewhere) common things…


#16

I lived in Ukraine in '95-'96, more or less like a well-off local. The buttons in the elevators in the apt. blocks were not flush with the panel, as is more common here in the States; instead, they protruded about half a centimeter. It was quite common for assholes to take a lighter to them and burn/melt them. Vandalism is much more common in the former Soviet Union. And as hinted above, the stairwells were often unlit smelly, feces and trash-covered hellholes; not a pleasant alternative.


#17

There’s an elevator in the Ministry of Education building (I believe) in Moscow that’s literally the smallest I’ve ever seen. My wife and I were able to squeeze in, but it was incredibly tight!

And it was quite slow too - our guide instead took 3 flights of stairs and still had time to light up a cigarette and wait for us to arrive!


#18

Guess you got some real education that day!


#19

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