The Carbon Bubble is about to pop


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/03/17/trump-notwithstanding.html


#2

As well described in Garret Hardens: The Tragedy of The Commons


#3

45’s own defense sec agrees and, wow!, does he look tired.


#4

China perceives an opportunity to weaken American geopolitical influence by presenting itself as a responsible steward of global stability.

America is absolutely a responsible steward - look how many jobs we created! And we worked very hard in business, quite a sacrifice.


#5

On a side note: Oil took a huge dump in the markets, so sorry oil barrons.


#6

Ask the people in my town whether $2.15 gasoline is a benefit to them, or not.

My neighbors who heat their homes with oil, and who drive, are cheering.


#7

The post-carbon industries – from solar to electric cars – are a way for rich investors to go long on climate action, and short hydrocarbons, and they become a force against the carbon barons’ efforts to continue burning fossil fuels unchecked

Let’s trade one set of robber-barons for another, WCGW?


#8

I don’t know where you live.


#9

I thought he said at one point it’s Whitopia. Maybe in Utah? Happy drivers there. So happy.


#10

Off topic, but as a Greater Bostonian, there are two places I have been afraid on the highway. Nashville and Salt Lake City.


#11

I’ve been there. Once. Almost blinded by the white. Sunglasses required. (Not to harsh too harshly on it, I’m sure it has its charms.)


#12

Ask the people in my town whether $2.15 gasoline is a benefit to them, or not.

I’m sure they like it. But it may have the same kind of “benefit” a $0.99 cheeseburger does. Tastes good, terrible for you.


#13

http://imgur.com/9Iyr4ZR

Always seems to be that way.

Live in one and lived in the other…can confirm.

If he lives in Utah, that explains his “belief” that socialism is bad. The LDS Church is big on the self reliant thing and if you want help, you have to work for it (which is fine). However, they also have this memory of the “BIG BAD GOVERNMENT!!” who drove them from their homes and made them flee to Utah and blah blah blah, so they have a BIG distrust of anything at the federal level.

On the plus side, the dumbasses…um I mean lawmakers have pretty much destroyed the tourist industry in favor of mining and oil companies so Utah is going to be hurting pretty soon.


#14

I like to ski there…


#15

Ah, SLC isn’t that bad. Try Scottsdale in February, at 6:00 pm. That is staring death in the face.


#16

by the time the LDS controlled government is finished, there won’t be any skiing left in the state.


#17

Judging by all available evidence, it’s the exurb called “Short-Term Thinking Estates.” AKA Galt’s Gulch Lite.

Careful, or he’ll call you an out-of-touch elitist who’s oppressing poor people by telling them what’s good for them.


#18


#19
The post-carbon industries -- from solar to electric cars -- are a way for rich investors to go long on climate action, and short hydrocarbons, and they become a force against the carbon barons' efforts to continue burning fossil fuels unchecked.

Building solar panels and electric cars requires energy – energy that is currently almost entirely derived from fossil fuels.

The materials to build these things require mining, which is an incredibly resource- and energy-intensive process almost entirely powered by fossil fuels.

The OP’s claim is simply false, very obviously so. Investing in building solar panels and electric cars increases demand for fossil fuels, and therefore price. “Shorting” is a bet that the price decreases, but investing in solar panels and electric cars increases the price.

This situation can only change when a large proportion of all energy is derived from sources besides fossil fuels. However, building out that infrastructure will require vast amounts of fossil fuels using current technologies.

Since building out a non-fossil fuel infrastructure requires vast amounts of fossil fuels, investing in that infrastructure increases the price of fossil fuels.

Ironically, this would save the fossil fuel industry since currently the situation is that oil prices are too low to profitably extract the stuff.

I don’t know why the OP is making claims that are so easily demonstrated to be the opposite of reality, but it’s something to think about.


#20

Maybe in your country, but no longer universally the case and increasingly so.