The least successful car ferry of all time


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/11/02/the-least-successful-car-ferry.html


#2

Why does the channel have a picture of a Cambodian signer who’s music seems to be added to the video? Pretty strange tribute, no?

Glad no one seems to have drowned (first guy in got picked up right?); hope their auto insurance covers boating accidents.


#3

Minor bummer of not seeing the big truck go under was offset by seeing dude get rescued.

I do think there have been worse ferry incidents, but possibly not with such a moving soundtrack.

Huh. And they were all Toyotas, too.


#4

The least successful car ferry of all time

MS Estonia… was a cruise ferry built in 1979/80… The ship sank in 1994 in the Baltic Sea in one of the worst maritime disasters of the 20th century… costing 852 lives.

If I recall, they didn’t close the RORO ramp correctly and the thing sank like a stone.


#5

If they can tow them out, they’ll probably run again. Tacos are pretty resilient.

Just don’t put them in a bag of rice.


#6

Is that ferry made of concrete?


#7

Definitely. Drain the crankcase and pull the spark plugs, refill the oil, spin the engine a few times to get most of the water out of the cylinders, replace plugs, fire it up for a few seconds, then change the oil a second time and drive it away.


#8

Probably. Cheaper than steel and doesn’t rust.


#9

Like a Liberty ship? What is wrong with liberty?


#10

#11

Nothing, so long as liberty is balanced.


#12

But what if liberty is valanced?


#13

The Captain went down with his pickup truck/ship.


#14

I don’t know of any concrete-hulled Liberty ships. The only one I’ve seen reasonably close up was the John Brown, it was steel.

You could tell he really loved that thing. A valiant effort that very nearly cost him his life. I kept expecting one of those pirogues to run over him as he came up…


#15

http://concreteships.org/ships/ww2/

Those 24 are Liberty ships.

Russians even made concrete submarines, iirc. Hulls don’t compress, great design.


#16

I’m guessing concrete shell with wood frame and foam inside. If it’s open on bottom you have to weight the bottom rim enough and make it deep enough to counteract the top heavy. But if you make it a full shell you have to watch for cracks and keep the sealant maintained or if water gets in it’ll all run to one corner. This looks like the latter.


#17

I am sure others have failed worse. Also, what is the pickup guy thinking. he wouldn’t let go of his truck when it was sinking even when he was close to the boat. Nerve racking.


#18

Well as long as it’s bivalenced that’s OK, cause you have to be one thing or another.

(I had to use a logic pun because nobody was stepping up with the chemistry one. You just left it hanging there for 'em, too.)


#19

The MS Estonia is also a nice example of the dangers of the free surface effect on stability. As the ship heels to one side any water in the hold or fuel in partially filled tanks will tend to flow to the lower side and make the heel even worse, until the boat capsizes.


#20

Yes, the flute music background made the disaster much more relaxing…