Tree trimming samurai in action!


#1

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#2

I don’t see how he still has two intact legs.


#3

He referenced the film They Still Call Me Bruce. I thought I was the only living human who knew of this movie.

Next thing people will tell me is they watch the Terrence Hill westerns or his later Superfuzz film.


#4

That tree is not trimming a samurai.

This post has been brought to you by hyphens.


#5

Superfuzz oh man I really want to see that one. I hear about so many films via ElDiabolik that I so want to see. Stupid work. I have seen My Name Is Nobody.


#6

there’s also a sequel to Nobody. I have them both on DVD somewhere. He also did a movie with Henry Fonda that was pretty entertaining.

Whenever I think of a cool cowboy, it isn’t Eastwood with a serape on. It’s Hill laying in a sled being dragged by his horse which seems to be more intelligent than he is. Or eating all the beans.


#7

When you close your eyes, Clarice, do you hear the trees screaming?


#8

This needs a soundtrack . . .


#9

It’s typical for Christmas tree farmers to use a machete for shaping, but they wear leather chaps or a long leather apron b/c eventually the trimmer will strike their leg.


#10

Yes, yes they will. Without a protective leg cover, I definitely wouldn’t have come out with both legs intact.


#11

Does anyone really think that perfectly conical christmas trees are in any way more attractive?

All my christmas trees have been wild, unruly, and generally lasted a lot longer than the factory formed, hyper-topiary stuff you get from a tree lot. Also they smelled better, and were actually tall enough to be majestic, rather than some poor, shabby-looking sapling.


#12

Mine is perfectly shaped once I unbend it all from storage. While I can deal with being around evergreens in general having one cooped up in the house with me for days means I am a miserable allergy suffering person. So that means paper/plastic/meal trees for me.


#13

I don’t celebrate christmas anymore, but the family has switched to a composite inorganic tree simulation as well. It drops a lot few needles, and is less of an enticement for the animals to drink from/piss in.


#14

We go for little trees. More ornaments per branch. Cheaper. Cuter.


#15

So it’s not a euphemism.


#16

I’m most impressed by the right-handed cut he tends to make towards the end of cutting each tree - a casual sort of underhand swipe that goes across his body. I do wonder what sword training he may have, if anyone here with sword training might want to speak to that.


#17

My favorite tree was the outdoor one, we strung up popcorn and cranberries, and made an ornament out of paperclips, tin foil and votive candles each night. I wonder if that tree is still alive, it was huge when my parents sold the property.


#18

Didn’t seem very special to me, with my admittedly limited swords education.

I think you could learn this in two or three days of on-the-job training without hurting yourself. Maybe a couple very careful weeks on your own.

(I’ve done mostly katas with bokkens.)


#19

He’s a regular Treeamoto Musashi :joy_cat:


#20

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