TX SWAT team beats, deafens nude man in his own home, lies about arrest; judge declines to punish cops or DA


#1

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#2

The real problem is that the cops were misled to think he was black. Wouldn’t you be angry to be fooled like that?


#3

If normal people are more scared of police than (other) criminals, that seems like a pretty good indicator that we live in a “police state.” I mean, I’m a middle class white guy with a steady job and no desire to make trouble for anyone, and I’m pretty damn nervous every time I see a cop, and I can’t remember the last time I was scared of anyone who’s not a cop.


#4

I’m old enough to remember that there was once an expectation of Miranda rights. If the police didn’t actually read or apply them, at least it was a governor on brown shirt type behavior.

When the eff does the pendulum swing back?


#5

If having a gun in the house is a problem for the police, then 2/3 of all Texans are in real trouble.


#6

This case needs to join those of Michael Brown and Tamir Rice and Eric Garner as an outrage. The racism is evident only in that the white man is left disabled but not dead after this home invasion - This man would have died “resisting arrest” if his skin were a different color.

The contempt for the rule of law shown by the police, and the district attorney in bringing multiple prosecutions is sick. Dismiss these people. Send them to jail. It cannot stand.

If you’re training your police to terrorise your citizens, stop invading Afghanistan and Iraq where these abuses are practiced and the art is honed.


#7

No, I think co-opting the BlackLivesMatter movement would be incredibly crass. Let’s sort out the issues pertaining to the state-sanctioned murder of visible minorities first, and then we can deal with the more generic case of police brutality.

The mind reels.


#8

I think the two go hand in hand. Dealing with the former will sort out the latter.


#9

the whole damn system is guilty as hell.


#10

I dare him to stand on the steps of the Jefferson Memorial and say that.


#11

“There is no freestanding constitutional right to be free from malicious prosecution.”

Yeah, really its a matter of your enjoyment of a quiet bath at home v. the enjoyment thugs get from suiting up and beating the shit out of you. Justice is blind, nothing to be done.


#12

If only the founding fathers had written something into the Constitution that affirmed the right to due process that would make a good counter argument to this judge’s assertion about malicious prosecution…


#13

friends do NOT call 5-0 on friends. Police are not family counsellors. they exist to arrest and charge. also? if you read the article? “grabbed me by my testicles slammed me on my face on the floor” is a line I never want to have to say.


#14

I have had the delight to have worked attached to a police SWAT team callup as a fire paramedic as well as the day to day hanging out police do at fire stations. It gives a unique and probably incomplete view into the very closed US police culture.
Police ARE as a general rule racist, but not in the classic Nazi racialist or Jim Crow era way people like to imagine, the institutional racism is as carefully hidden as a illegal search, it is racism that stands up to most middle class public scrutiny as well as judicial inquiry, it is also racism which stands up as justified in the mind of even an educated but then institutionally corrupted former member of the community.
Police racism is not a racial supremacist white thing, they are in my experience universally accepting of the minorities who wear a badge.
They are also fine and very respectful to known and identified members of the community who could have their jobs terminated whatever their race, though whatever the race even well connected ‘civilians’ are treated with the suspicion only proper for an outsider.
Rather police institutional racism is using race to profile economic and societal standing, the color of the skin, the tattoo markings, the condition of the house, clothing, or vehicle; as well as the attitude test are what will make the difference between a respectful interaction or a lethal lead hailstorm in most cases.
The racism is but one component weighed in the street-smart-cop decision process, it is used for the most part equally by police of all races, and it is camouflaged well enough that they will continue to get away with it for the foreseeable future with full approval of the vast majority of the middle and upper class.

The police have a monopoly on using violence allegedly as agents of the body of the people so their actions as well as those of the prosecution automatically receive an assumption of action in good faith in all but the most egregious cases, this action in the name of the people immunizes them individually from almost all civil actions as well. They are a privileged class, no matter the race of the individual officer, with a nationwide culture that has evolved to the point that most interactions are engineered to knowingly abuse that assumption of good faith.


#15

This is the tragedy of the bill of rights, the opponents rightly feared that in the future basic human rights not enumerated would be extinguished, even for free property owning white males. I think it is fair to say that without the bill of rights even that limited sample set of freedoms would have also been eliminated.


#16

Sounds legit.


#17

LAND OF THE FREE™ *

*May not apply on continental Unite States, isles, protectorates or other masses of land. Constitutional rights may be declared null on any time. May contain nuts.


#18

All this because he happened to have a gun? I will need to remember the protocol should I ever need to visit my local police station.


#19
There is no freestanding constitutional right to be free from malicious prosecution.
Sure, whatever. Then I guess they could only be held accountable for the *assault and battery*, the beating, shooting, testicle grabbing, and all that. I'm pretty sure that on paper Americans do have some rights concerning those. What a feeble excuse.

#20

And there you have it. A police state. It’s not your Mayberry RFD community representative police force any more, it is an occupying army.

Thank you for your insights, dobby.