"Ursonite" is a fascinating spoken poem of primordial sounds by Kurt Schwitters

Originally published at: "Ursonite" is a fascinating spoken poem of primordial sounds by Kurt Schwitters | Boing Boing

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Good stuff. Having flashbacks to my Leistungskurs Deutsch (Sekundarstufe II) now, though.

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I’m a big Schwitters fan.

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You misspelled the title in your headline

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Came here to share this. :+1:

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The “delivery” reminds me of Sprechgesang… as much as I can tell from having only listened to Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire.

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Interesting that if you Google the misspelling you’ll find a handful of websites that all seem to scrape from each other, judging from the similarly worded headlines.

This animated short was my first exposure to this masterwork.

It blows my mind that some performers have recited Ursonate dozens or hundreds of times, live on stage. Think about what that does to your brain.

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I’m failing to find the video I want of Schwitters* explaining eventualism. Eventualism doesn’t answer all questions, but questions all answers. Eventualism isn’t about healing pain, but about the pain, of healing.

*another Schwitters

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Lyrics by Kurt Schwitters:

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There is a theory that Japanese is the only language in which vowel sounds have semantic meaning which enables some native Japanese speakers to hear natural sounds, such as the wind or the ocean, as language.

You know, I never made this connection.
Soderbergh probably made this reference on purpose.
Schizopolis is a brilliant film, in my opinion, but it’s difficult.

Does Ursonate have more or less Ursa than Ursonite? It’s been awhile since freshman chemistry, I forget these things

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