Watch this loving restoration of a rusty old hammer to its former glory


#21

Rust is a vector for more rust. You want to remove it before it eats its way too deep into the metal.

I’ve seen a video of the same stacking technique using birchtbark instead of leather. The effect was gorgeous.
Ah, how about I not be lazy and find the link… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLnqr6IGVgs Maybe it was another one I was thinking of, but this short movie shows it.


#22

That’s the way handles on all the old Estwings are. I know some framing guys who swear by them. They seem overpriced and underbuilt to me.


#23

That guy is one that I like to watch. Folks who can manufacture their own replacement parts are awesome.


#24

After watching the chainsaw video, this is what YouTube showed me next:

It starts out pretty straightforward, but quickly turns to “Wait, what?”

Lots of fun, though.


#25

Nicely done. I’m a little shocked the hose coupler was stock, and not…you know…machined from a random hunk of brass.


#26

Thanks for sharing that knife making video- awesome!


#27

Similar topic, Leah from See Jane Drill restores a vintage drill press: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlzXArxhqTs


#28

Man. All that work, and at the end I see he just plans on using it as an arm-hair shaver.

You can buy an arm-hair shaver for, what, a fiver at the dollar store.


#29

Rust gets on everything, and is hard to remove. If you are doing interior or finish work, a rusty hammer would leave stains on light colored wood, and also everywhere you set it down. Likewise any other tools it comes in contact with.
Rust is pure evil.


#30

Rust never sleeps.
7lions video was fascinating! Man I wish I had that kind of time on my hands.


#31

Seconded.

His vice restoration is also impressive (possibly linked from BB originally? Once you watch a few of these YouTube is very generous with the suggestions so it’s easy to lose track.)


#32

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