Watch this motorbike engine disintegrate a millimeter at a time


#1

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#2

So they put it on a giant mill ‘n’ drill and took it down a millimeter at a time?


#3

Scan every layer, make a 3d model.


#4

The misleading text implies that we’ll see it go away entirely. We didn’t even make it to the valves!


#5

Fun fact, this is how histological scanning of organs is done.

For instance, when someone dies and donates their brain for science, they scan it by deep-freezing it, then grind off a tiny amount, take an ultra high rez photo of the ground surface, grind it down just a tiny bit more, another photo, rinse and repeat. Eventually you get a stack of photos of the brain’s structure in one hand, and a pile of rapidly melting ground up brain-dust in the other.


#6

Reverse-engineering of integrated circuits (or fault analysis) is done also the same way. This time you polish away layer by layer and the layers are thinner, but the principle stays.


#7

Interesting. I didn’t know that.

I assumed that since most printed circuits are entirely 2D, you could just look at them with a sufficiently powerful microscope. Like with scanning probe microscopy or something.


#8

Printed circuits, you need xray or peeling apart the layers for multilayer ones, especially the more-than-2-layers ones. (2-layer ones, just strip the parts and scan the boards.)

Integrated circuits are also multilayer. You have two or more layers of metalization and vias in between them.



#9

I assume the black-and-white one is an electron micrograph? It’s very pretty.


#10

Yes. There are many more on the Net, ask google images for “integrated circuit” “cross section”. And/or “electron microscope”.


#11

I’d seriously like to get that stuff framed for my wall. Along with micrographs of biological stuff.


#12

That. And xrays of all sorts of things.


#13

It’s cool to see the insides of things. How they are put together, and how they work. I really like watching x-ray videos from way back in the day before they didn’t know looking at someone’s skull for an hour and a half would melt their brain. You get to see lots of different processes that are going on all the time, but you don’t notice piloting the meat-puppet around. Our bodies are masters of automation :smiley:


#14

The “exploded view” is my favorite technical illustration. Here’s the engine in the Ducati bikes my dad had when I was a kid:


#15

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