We only see 5% of the universe


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/01/19/we-only-see-5-of-the-universe.html


#2

Why doesn’t “normal” (i.e. not dark) energy get a slice of the pie?


#3

I fully expect that “dark matter” and “dark energy” will go the way of ether as an explanatory concept in physics. They may be a useful part of the model for now, but I don’t expect them to survive.


#4

This is about the known unknown, but what about the unknown unknown?


#5

I agree. This seems like an ad hoc idea. Our theory of gravity seems to work pretty well, but we have gathered data that doesn’t fit with it. It can’t be that we don’t fully understand gravity, there must be something invisible!


#6

It would take a bit of work to do that at least as I understand it since the Standard Model does allow for such weakly interacting particles. It would really be interesting to see how a model could be created where all particles have to interact across all four forces.


#7



#8

Having just binged Oh No Ross and Carrie’s 5-parter on Flat Earthers, reading this article feels like getting a love letter in prison.


#9


#10

Funny. She actually lists reasons why DM isn’t a modern day aether: http://www.astrokatie.com/faq/#darkmatter


#11

We only see 5% of the universe

5%? That’s amazing we see that much.


#12

If the universe is infinitely large, then we see an infinitely small piece of it.

(But I get what she means.)


#13

Those are the things we don’t know that we don’t know.


#14

Good line for a song.


#15

Obligatory:


#16

and it’s the crappy 5%


#17

Its the 1% you have to worry about, thinking they’re special because they’ve got all the Hydrogen.


#18

Need a light?


#19

5% of infinity is still a pretty big infinite set


#20

I’m not buying it.

They invented DAM because the universe doesn’t behave in accordance with how relativity predicts.

Eventually though the problems with Einstein’s gravity point to some 90% of the universe having to be something invisible.

So dark stuff is something we assume exists because of a theory which doesn’t explain 90% of the universe.