We're going to be eating bugs really soon now, again


#21

Not yet.

:slight_smile:


#22

What’s the shelf life?


#23

From “The Wiseguy Cookbook” by Henry Hill: “A lot of wiseguys were crazy for lobsters. They’d have the bugs two, three times a week.”


#24

I’m totally down, as soon as it is actually a cheaper option. While cricket flour stays above $30/lb, I’m going to stick with legumes.


#25

It’s worth noting, just for safety’s sake, that some people who are allergic to shellfish may also be allergic to edible insects.


#26

I’m just remembering this, from a while back.


#27

It might be worth noting here for those who weren’t already aware that according to the New Testament, Jesus’s cousin John the Baptist dwelt in the wilderness eating locusts and wild honey. (“Two great tastes that taste great together.”)

The Book of Leviticus in the Old Testament specifically mentions locusts, crickets and grasshoppers as being kosher.

Leviticus 11:22–11:22

  1. Of them you may eat: the locust according to its kind, the bald locust according to its kind, the cricket according to its kind, and the grasshopper according to its kind.

I wouldn’t generally recommend the Old Testament as words to live by, however.


#28

Instead of eating bugs and worms, you could just eat a plant-based diet like the one at ForksOverKnives.com/recipes because believe it or not all plant food has protein,and they all contain all of the essential amino acids.

There’s a reason why so many NFL and NBA players are eating this way. And of course we Kendrick Farris, the USA’s current recording breaking Olympic weightlifter eating a whole-foods plant-based diets, no protein shakes or any of that junk either.

If you can be a professional athlete from eating bean burrito’s and vegetable curries, I think it’s safe to say the diet has enough protein for everyone.


#29

It’s still not necessary to eat bugs to get protein; ask any vegan.


#30

Well, I’m not sure about other insect, but I know the trick to properly serving gagh is to be sure it’s still live…


#31

Are you gagging right now?


#32

I was then, but not right now.


#33

#34

This just in:

Results demonstrate cricket consumption is tolerable and non-toxic at the studied dose. Cricket powder supported growth of the probiotic bacterium, Bifidobacterium animalis , which increased 5.7-fold. Cricket consumption was also associated with reduced plasma TNF-α. These data suggest that eating crickets may improve gut health and reduce systemic inflammation; however, more research is needed to understand these effects and underlying mechanisms.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-29032-2


#35

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