Who owns the Statue of Liberty? CGP Grey explains


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/11/03/who-owns-the-statue-of-liberty.html


#2

NYC, obviously.

If Jersey wants it they’ll have to TRY and take it by main force.


#3

Well the statue is obviously NY’s. I mean it was a gift specifically to New York City. From the French.

Jersey just claims it owns the land under it. And is thus entitled to all that sweet, sweet tourist money.


#4

Geez, New York is a jerk. “Bridge and tunnel crowd” my ass.


#5

Who owns the Statue of Liberty? The question should be, who wore it worst?

Answer: the woman on the left.


#6

The location of the marine border becomes very important for anglers when the 2 states have different fishing regulation. Getting caught with undersized fish or too many on the wrong side can cost you hundreds. The law doesn’t care where they were caught, you just can’t be possessing them in the state!

That Shooters Island mentioned at the very end is a trippy place. It’s literally covered in scrap iron from when it was surrounded by piers. I shot the photo below while kayaking and stopped there, because, umm, nature called.


#7

Thank you so much for not photographing your junk along with the state’s junk.


#8

You’re welcome. I’m not of the generation that considers images of their junk to be of interest to anyone. Anatomical junk that is. As a semi-hoarder my actual junk is FASCINATING!


#9

That’s a very funny ending.


#10

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#11

The mental image of a well-endowed Spock doesn’t scan.


#12

@Urbanacus
@Boundegar

Might I suggest that you go straight to 4:00


#13

You should hear my uncle bitch about CA fishing regs when he was doing it professionally. He had one of those Salmon licenses that you can’t get any more and when he retired he sold it for some serious cash.


#14

I’ve never met a commercial fisherman who didn’t regularly complain that the regulations around their target species were far too strict. While simultaneously complaining that the regulations on all the other fish were far too loose.


#15

I don’t really know the details. He is kinda of a hippy. I know he ended up making the most money finding exotic stuff for big aquariums. He did ok for himself from the sound of it.


#16

Those of us who enjoy fishing between NJ, DE, and MD deal this issue often. We’re grateful that captains and crews make such an effort to keep things legal, because the regulations (sizes & limits) seem to change every year. I once heard about a person caught with a basket of undersized crabs who was fined per crab. That was a very costly mistake, and a good lesson for others who might be tempted to ignore the law.


#17

One nice thing about living out west is that you don’t have to worry about the laws of other states when the closest one is four hours away.


#18

Quibble. Not EVERY colonial river border runs along the middle of the river. The border between Maryland and Virginia is the mean low water level on the VA side. At one time there were a number of piers built out into the river from Virginia to take advantage of the fact that at the time, slot machines were legal in MD but not VA.


#19

Begun, the Oyster Wars have…


I have the feeling that dispute goes back longer (pre-Revolutionary) , with some boundary questions too. I’ll have a look later.


#20

Interesting (well to me anyway) note not mentioned in the video. Border disputes between states are one of the VERY few types of cases where the Supreme court is the first stop. Where rather than functioning as an appeals court that only decides question of what the law is, they actually decide questions of what the facts are. ISTR that since they have neither experience or staff for this, they actually appointed a special master to investigate the facts for them before they heard the latest round of this dispute.