You can help the web be better in 2018: just ditch Facebook and use your browser instead


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/12/28/bookmarks-r-us.html


#2

Like Moose and Squirrel when write misleading headline


#4

The whole point of facebook is that a lot of people don’t know how to use the web.


#5

So I share this article to facebook to tell people to get off facebook?


#6

I use facebook to join in a couple of cool model terrain based groups. I guess that these groups could create their own webpages, but then they would be less visible and, therefore, less well visited. I try to avoid any “news” on facebook.


#7

Yeah, it’s AOL all over again.

I won’t be able to get my older relatives off of Facebook. I recently joined ::ugh:: snapchat to be able to chat with my nieces and nephews in their native environment. Google+ and Diaspora never took off. What’s the alternative?


#8

When all of my friends have a “home page” that they update regularly with pictures/thoughts/stories about their lives… that’s when I ditch facebook.

Man the 90’s were a crazy time. I thought for awhile maybe html and css would be taught in grade school and everyone would have their own web address just like an email address except more like a real address an “unreal address” if you would. They’d link to their friends pages… they’d choose their own layouts… they’d have links to their favorite band’s homepages.

I guess that’s just too hard for the average person.


#9

No Fbook, never.


#10

Haha! I logged in with Facebook to leave this message!

The problem isn’t Facebook. It’s the way people use Facebook. I am part of a 501©(3) arts organization. We have daily posts with artwork on our WordPress site, and we use social media to link back to the articles. Every day we post an image and a link to that day’s article. If you like the picture, click through to see more. Lots of likes, but very few people click through. That isn’t Facebook’s fault. It’s people not paying attention. If you want quality content, you have to search out and appreciate quality content. It doesn’t matter if it’s the WWW or Twitter or Facebook. You have to make the minimal effort to filter, seek out and click through.


#11

It seems to me that Facebook is a great example of the effect of repealing net neutrality. I used to think that if I friended somebody, or if I decided to follow a page, I would get all of their posts. That doesn’t seem to be the case. Facebook decides which posts to show me and, for good effect, adds some more post that I did not ask for and also suggestions of posts to share. It also seems that lately some of the post from some of the news sources are displayed with one or more days of delay, so not “news” anymore. The funniest and saddest thing is the way they keep on asking me to follow their leader.

Please_follow_me

Again, the only reason why I stay in FB is because of common-interest groups.


#12

Nice article. Now I feel better that I never signed up for FB. Not that I have anything against them, I just never bothered. (LinkedIn is about enough I can deal with.)


#13

I would have to join Facebook first to quit. I suppose I can, if it will make a difference.


#14

I think Facebook’s days are numbered, the kids don’t use it, media companies hate it, and the ads don’t actually work that well.

Pretty soon a bunch of its devs are going to split off and start something new, at least that’s my guess on the death of Facebook will occur.


#15

I use FB to see what family and friends are up to. Never click on shared political stories or polls. Certainly never click on anything sponsered or in trending. Only problem is why I’ll use web searches sometimes people just have FB pages. So now you have to follow them if you want to see their updates.


#16

Facebook is terrible, and bad for the human race.

But how do you really feel?


#17

This is the key: FB is used by older, less web-savvy people to connect with each other. It is easier for them than using email or a plain web browser. It allows them to easily publish stuff and to keep tabs on relatives, friends, and acquittances, or to follow their favorite celebrities or politicians.


#18

In my day, websites like this one had “links” pages so people could hop around from site to site discovering cool stuff.
I’m not sure when that ended, probably around the Facebook era.
It also seems to that sites do a lot less linking to other sites now a days. Hoarding clicks?


#19

And whatever happened to those “web rings”?


#20

Nope. It’s called “MySpace”.

Personally I avoid ALL social media, besides carefully-chosen blogs and Canadian purveyors of silliness =).


#21

I love your stuff @doctorow but like a lot of vegans, you may be missing that this is the kind of lead that can shut down an argument. Facebook is kind of like meat in that way too.

There’s ethical alternatives, such as:
https://diasporafoundation.org/

But even if they once had a hugely successful crowdfunding campaign, people still went back to Facebook in time because it gave them the protein hit they craved.

/am vegetarian BTW, not vegan
//often feel like I’m apologizing for vegans
/// am soft on Facebook too and only use it as I absolutely must in a separate browser
////Wife HATES me for Facebook veganism too
/////strangely OK with the real vegetarian thing
//////we need better leading arguments than purity
///////slashies