You can start making your own games today. Yes, you!


#1

[Read the post]


#2


#3

I made a game earlier this year. It’s about a Tuesday.


#4

Wasn’t there just an article on how the notion of a game being “fun” was outmoded?

[quote=“boingboing, post:1, topic:59414”]You don’t have to be a professional writer to enjoy keeping a journal[/quote]No, but the output of professional writers tends to be held to a certain standard and may generally be expected to be of greater value than someone’s journal.


#5

That was great. I got emotional. SRSLY.


#6

Thanks so much!


#7

As a bitter ex-game developer, this “everyone make games” thing annoys me, and I can’t even quite figure out why. Maybe it’s because it’s one thing to make a game, it’s another thing to make a good game, and once you learn the difference, it’s really, really hard.
Maybe it’s how established journos trapped in the horrible system get annoyed at bloggers who have freedom. I dunno. Just putting it out here.


#8

My kids are already acing Hopscotch. They can do in 5 minutes what took me 2 days to do in 1985. And purddier.

I heartily endorse.


#9

Would you say the same about woodworking? There are plenty of people who make a living by carving/building with wood. There are also hobbyists who do this but have no intention of it being their career. Occasionally the latter become the former, and I don’t think the former ever get mad about that.


#10

lol I don’t think Zoe is anyone you would want to take tips from on the industry…


#11

A better comparison might be how anyone can call themselves a “Photographer” now, and it annoys real photographers.


#12


#13

Isn’t such an outlook self-aggrandisingly exclusionary? I can be happy for anybody who feels accomplished in something that interests them. But using this to insist that others can’t/aren’t really doing anything seems quite petty. I can’t think of any endeavors which are improved by pissing contests.


#14

@Mindysan33 actually inspired me (inadvertently, or perhaps, conspiratorially) earlier today to consider the awesomeness of a game I would like to make called “RPG Zombie.” I was just thinking it would be really cool to make.


#15

Do it! That would be awesome-sauce.


#16

I can’t really explain it, which is why I was just floating it out there w/o much explanation. And I’ve noticed others seemingly acting the same (aforementioned journos attacking bloggers). I figured a forum would be an interesting place to solicit opinions on the idea.

Like most emotions, I’m not saying it’s justified, nor do I indulge it (I’ve actually talked to many amateur/aspiring devs, both on a hobby and professional level), so it’s not like I’ve thrown any daggers myself.

Might be the Hollywood glossing of a profession. You don’t see people saying “Anyone can practice medicine at home!” much, but for some reason, the “anyone can code” meme has gone further, whereas when I was in school, I remember an awful lot of people taking classes where they tried to avoid a) math, or b) writing papers, so clearly there’s some differentiation in mindsets.

The kicker for me was the Silicon Valley guy who decided to teach a homeless man to code, and somehow the idea that what you may have spent your whole life to do, some 20-something is trivializing away with a “Here’s a ‘Teach Yourself JavaScript in 30 Days’ book, study it in a week and I’ll give you a salary.” On one hand, we’ve got a whole workforce of experienced people out there, and on the other hand, we’re saying the experience is useless and you can just pick up a Ruby book and have a career. The “anyone can code” seems to subscribe to that philosophy beyond a simple “here, have fun building a ship in a bottle in your living room.”

Again, not saying I have a conclusion here, nor am I saying I know what’s going on, but I’m thinking it’s an interesting discussion. And the folks at BB are the type who I’d figure might have some insight to share. I realize I’m broadening this beyond games, but I do think it’s the same as the “anyone can code” idea, just a specific branch.

I do also know that the same ones don’t tend to say “Here, learn openGL” as much as “Here, play with GameMaker and make the 6.022*10^23 sidescroller or tile based RPG.”


#17

There are many people who are convinced that their careers should come with benefices. They feel entitled to certain markets - if not not individually, then at least for “their own kind”. From that perspective you are stealing from the pro you didn’t hire when you let an impostor shoot your wedding.


#18

And as I am not an art history major, I’d love to know if the same thing happened when you had the old guard who spent all their time learning to paint with realism and a new class of painter came along breaking from that representation in a way that didn’t take the same time commitment of skill.

I’m sure this is like any other cultural/academic evolution of profession.


#19

Yeah, that’s probably a great example. Shooting on film with manual cameras is way different than a digital that does a bunch of the work for you, and as those become cheaper, the barrier to entry becomes lower and lower.

However, as photo development becomes turnkey, you start seeing a million of the same style based on the filters the camera/software has, instead of someone finding an interesting exposure in the dark room.


#20

I’m a hobbyist dev, and this website is really great. There is so much content farm, SEO-laden clickbait out there, it can be hard to shuffle through tp find real advice and information. A simple, well-laid-out interface of prescreened resources is really a goddessend.