A guide to prisons for white collar criminals


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/05/29/a-guide-to-prisons-for-white-c.html


#2

Good to know, though instead of complaining how grat such places are, we should be pointing out that all U.S. prisons should be like this. Rehabilitation works much better than mere punishment.


#3

It’s long been known by those who care that Federal prisons are better than State prisons. A matter of degree but useful knowledge to those considering criminal behavior.


#4

If anything the conditions should be swapped. Poor people/ minorities trapped in a cycle of criminality, either by being completely innocently sucked into the system from dragnet stop-and-frisk bullshit or being cornered into grey and black markets by socioeconomic exclusion and marginalization are the ones who need rehabilatation. Rehab in the sense of consciously reinviting them into the legal economy, and building some trust and buy-in into systems that had abandoned and abused them, and work to repair the psychological damage of the prison pipeline itself.

White collar criminals, on the other hand are more likely to be sociopaths for whom the system has worked so well, it was almost like it was designed for them. And that tweaking and twisting it to their will was extremely profitable. As the article suggests they rarely get caught, as illegal activity so closely resembles legal (albeit immoral) behavior so the risk reward, even after encarceration is tilted in favor of further games. These are the ones who need to be shown that crossing that line drops you right down the the bottom, out of comfort, out of freedom, out of power


#5

See?
This is why you go to college.


#6

I remember when I was in high school the book of lists had a section on how to pick the best federal prison. I read that part over and over again.


#7

What! I “earned” over a billion dollars. Why should I go live in a dorm?


#8

#9

I had a client who went to a federal white collar prison. It didn’t seem like the amenities described here were available where he went. The biggest advantage was that it wasn’t as dangerous as regular federal prison, which wasn’t as dangerous as state prisons.


#10


#11

From my bit of googling, I can’t tell the details of how security classification works in the US.

Is it handed out as part of sentencing, or is there a separate process.

Also, I suspect I know the answer to this one, but for the same type of crime, is there a demographic difference in who gets minimum security classification?


#12

Do we have any good data on rehabilitating white-collar criminals?

Off the cuff; I’d imagine that the sort of depraved characters who indulge in criminality without being the products of particularly hostile circumstances, immediate economic necessity, or dumb impulsivity would be among the most incorrigible; but the cuff is a poor substitute for hard data.


#13

The Book of Lists!


#14

Hum. We DO know that Martha Stewart started hanging with Snoop Dog…


#15

The guy I know definitely tried to keep his nose clean after he got out. But once that mental barrier to criminality has been broken down, it’s hard to rebuild it.


#16

Will pass this onto my scumbag boss who is making us work today whilst he plays golf. Fucker.


#17

My sympathies!

Since the boss isn’t there, someone should crank up this one:


#18

#19

you earn points based on the nature of the crime, your sex, the length of your sentence and few other factors. Collect enough points and you earn an invitation to the big house, I think the BOP does the assignation.


#20

We’ve been drinking since lunch time, and the Pink Floyd is blasting.