A neural "off-switch" for pain documented


#21

Glen’s comment is very accurate in all details.


#22

I’m interested - can you tell me more?

I have chronic migraine, and normal pain medication is ineffective. I’ve seen the studies showing how amputees can reduce phantom pain by looking at a mirror reflection of their remaining limb, and gradually the pain rewires things and the pain goes away. Wondering how I can do that for my head.


#23

Okay, that still leaves me wondering: why would nsaids relieve pain [generally] for some people when they only inflict pain [intestinally] for others?


#24

Er no idea sorry! They work for me. By diminishing the initial acute phase swelling, they reduce the actual mechanical issue, and help me into the virtuous cycle of confusing my brain.


#25

Milton Erickson, major hypnotism expert, apparently managed polio pain throughout his life.

I’ve used this in a bio mechanical area only, didn’t verge into migraines etc, but check out www.specialistpainphysio.com - they publish articles and point to research.

One key tenet is our brains seem to have flash memory specifically for recording pain events. If a pain trigger similar to a prior event occurs, eg my lower back pain, then the entire system lights up and “lies” to the other members of my brain, pushing me to sit down and rest until remedied, which is, outside of acute phase, false, and counter productive.


#26

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