After 8-year absence from YouTube, co-founder posts comment about comment policy


#1

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#2

why the f$$k don’t I need a Google+ account to comment here?

Work on it, dark forces of hegemony…


#3

It’s nice to see a YouTube co-founded contributing to the common stereotype of YouTube commenters.


#4

[quote=“SpunkyTWS, post:3, topic:13845, full:true”]
It’s nice to see a YouTube co-founded contributing to the common stereotype of YouTube commenters.
[/quote]Needs more racism.


#5

Indeed. YouTube comments are the absolute worst of the worst. Anything that makes people have to go a couple of more steps before spewing forth a font of racist and homophobic slurs is okay by me.


#6

Rule #1 on all websites: Don’t read the comments. Ever.


#7

Rule #1 on all websites: Don’t read the comments. Ever.


#8

Rule #1 on all websites: Don’t read the comments. Ever.


#9

Do people believe in any anonymity at all online?

Or is the cost of skipping shitty comments just too damn high?


#10

In some contexts online anonymity is important, but I don’t believe it has improved the quality of YouTube video comments.


#11

I’m kind of curious that he went 8 years without even TRYING to comment on a video on youtube. I mean – I don’t do it very often, but 8 years is a LONG TIME. AFAIK you can’t Up/Down vote a video without being logged in, either… so he’s not tried to do that since they integrated?


#12

Yeah, because the real name policy on Facebook has really stopped the spewing of racist and homophobic slurs.


#13

I moved 11 posts to a new topic: How off-topic is too off-topic?


#14

My nose bleeds for him. Who did he think he was selling it to, and why did he think they wouldn’t integrate it with their own products?


#15

Maybe he liked the …open… nature of YouTube comments. It certainly reveals a lot about human nature.

“It’s not a bug, it’s a feature”


#16

Dear Jawed Karim: Because you decided you’d rather have a kajillion dollars than control over your creation, that’s why.


#17

ESPN recently switched over to using Facebook ids for commenting. Now you see the (most likely) real name and a photo of the person who left a comment. Often you even see the name of their employer. People are still as mean, trollish, and thoughtless as when they were anonymous.

As for why the co-founder of YouTube didn’t insist on better when selling to Google, given the pressure YouTube was under from the MPAA and other content organizations, if they didn’t sell to Google, they probably would have become a footnote in the history of the Internet and we’d be discussing how Google Video became embedded into Google+ itself.


#18

co-founder… I believe he only received half a kajillion dollars…


#19

Been reading BB for nearly a decade now and have never commented on anything, but I’m too surprised by this not to ask…

I thought the general consensus on BB was to push for online anonymity? I find it surprising that so many tech / culture sites are in agreement that we should sacrifice the anonymity of Youtube accounts in favor of an overarching Google+ that is connected to our identities in the real world.

What I love most is Xeni posting this condemnation of Jawed’s opinion oh… the day after posting about BB’s move to pushing out more content on G+.

"Add us to your circles"


#20

Even more essential than Ad-Block: