After double lot sold to separate owners, one of them erects fence through pool and garage

The most disturbing part of the video was how the news reporter pronounces realtor.

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Seriously. It’s not Ree-la-tour. It’s pronounced Real-tour.

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The real headline: “Florida Man buys house with half a pool. Then Another Florida Man does it, too.”

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I grew up in Texas. It was always “real-a-ter”.

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Truly, it is man’s indomitable will to win at negative-sum games that elevates the human spirit far beyond the base realm of brute beasts.

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Once part of the structure of the main lot crept over the property line, there should have either been a permanent easement made or (more realistically considering just how over the property line everything is) the lots should have been combined into a single parcel of land. Whoever is responsible for overseeing this in Orlando majorly screwed the pooch by allowing this situation to occur in the first place.

However, as the situation stands now, the owner of the vacant lot cannot even use his land because its being trampled on by the neighboring lot. Their response seems petty but I’m torn on how I feel about it, especially with the circumstances surrounding the purchases being unknown.

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This side is the non-peeing side of the pool, dammit!

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It’s Florida…people don’t actually use their pools. Hell, they don’t even go outside.

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OK, but, this is where you can literally have Bugs Bunny sawing through everything.

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A fence? How retro. Lasers a-go-go fit the bill. Any attempted cross-boundary trespass is motion-detected; lasers are aimed, with a warning flash before the burn-for-effect pulses. That’s how they do it in Sillycon Valley. But hey, this is Florida, soon to be submerged. Let them have their little spat. Won’t matter before long. How long can they tread water?

I’m gonna be that person, but here goes. This would not fly in my town. Even if you own adjacent lots you have to maintain setbacks to the property lines for projects like this (a pool, house or accessory building like a shed) that are determined by the zoning code. I work for municipal government and boy is fascinating. People will literally do anything without consulting with the County then act amazed or upset when they get a violation and liens against the property for building without permits. Fun for all!

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It could be worse


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Well, hello there colleague!
Looks like some things really are universal…

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I think I have the solution:


The owners just have to agree that they will both occupy both properties simultaneously, but never acknowledge each other’s existence. Chance encounters — in the pool, say, or the bedrooms — will be dealt with by ignoring (“unseeing”) the presence of the other(s).

Really, all it would take is a little goodwill and neighborly spirit on both sides. :expressionless:

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Based on experience I don’t trust the government to do anything they say they do. That has served me well. Verify but don’t trust.

It’s all so very “Florida”! Cities that don’t enforce setback rules. Cities that tolerate structures spanning multiple residential lots. Sales that split combined lots into multiple lots without consideration of what is on the lots. Inspectors, appraisers and mortgage lenders saying “this is fine!”. People building fences over pools and through garages.

Hence, Mar-a-Lago.

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So, who pays the water bill? Who pays the pool guy? Is Florida real, or did The Onion make it up? These and other questions will be answered on the next episode of Derp.

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