Archaeologist dug up a 500-year-old skeleton wearing boots


#21

#22

Only when they aren’t shooting an elephant in their pajamas. :thinking:


#23

How did it get in their pajamas?


#24

WTF. who is this person. These are 15th century mudlarking waders. they still make these EXACT boots. there is no reason to assume he didn’t legitimately own them. as did many mudlarkers, a necessary tool of the profession. mudlarking was a profession based around walking out into the mudflats of the Thames sifting through the muck for things to sell, collecting them and getting out and not stuck before the water came back in. this guy didn’t make it, many didn’t. life was tough back then. he was a mudlarker.

the real mystery is the ignorance around the history related to the exact place this person was found, his boots, the profession, etc…even i know this shit and i grew up in north america and am not a historian.

smdh.


#25

… Rekt

.
*sorry


#26

I propose new occupational terms for North America:

1.thriftlarking

2.dumpsterlarking


#27

in our town we have trash to treasure days. everyone drags out stuff they don’t want to the edge of their yard and puts up a t2t sign, and you can drive around and help yourself to anything you want. at the end of the day, whatever is still there gets taken back inside for the next t2t or dealt with in another way.

i love it, it is hundreds of free micro-yardsales.


#28

Seriously, where can I get boots like these?


#29

Boots, you say? Reminds me of a song. Filed under “unlikely songs covered by unlikely bands”.


#30
  1. yardlarking

#31

£400.00 model 15/7TH from Plantagenet Shoes in the UK.
They specialize in handmade historical footware.

if you don’t need thigh high or muckproof wading then slightly lower boots below the knee were worn for horse riding during the same period. the turnover leather roll up to tighten boot was the working mans boot of the 15th century from that area.

there are also thigh high styles that aren’t waders for a bit cheaper from a few sellers, i’m not sure which professions used these. likely one that needed “protective footware” which is what these were at the time.

https://vehi-mercatus.de/Ridingboots-15th-16th-century-with-lining


#32

Aw man… those are some nice boots. My boots are the only badly non-period of my garb…

They DO need a new website though… but I bet they get offers every other week.


#33

NOT to be confused with yardlurking or tompeeping! :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


#34

That’s is the most plausible answer. To be fair to NatGeo, FTA:

Or perhaps he was a “mudlarker,” a slang term for those who scavenge along the Thames’ muddy shore at low tide. The man’s wader-like thigh boots would have been ideal for such work.


#35

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