Big Motorcycle wants to make fixing your own bike a crime


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/01/26/big-motorcycle-wants-to-make-f.html


#2

Nebraska better rethink this if they ever want their own American Chopper spinoff show.


#3

because it would be too dangerous to let anyone but the manufacturer work on a bike.

50 years in the saddle and that’s some bullshit right there I ever saw.


#4

Those industry groups are there to take the heat from bikers, and leave the manufacturers and individual repair shops out of it. If contacted, they’ll say, “WE REPRESENT THE INTERESTS OF OUR MEMBERS”.

A few email blasts with a petition to every dealer and independent ATV/Motorcycle repair shop promising to cease business with them for supporting this addition might have a few jump ship, an pressure their own industry groups to back off.

I’d want to see a “Right to Repair Supporter” sign in any dealer or service center before I’d want to deal with them.


#5

I thought tinkering with a motorcycle was half the reason people own one. :thinking:


#6

Next up on the rentier corporate agenda, criminalizing bicycle repair. That’s right hipsters, they’re comin’ for yer fixies. Stand with your natural two-wheel allies or we shall all go over the handlebars together!


#7

Let the ICE versions of these vehicles have their ridiculous laws letting only the manufacturer repair them, BUT make the all electric models repairable by anyone. This will help the electric versions be more desirable as they are easily and cheaply fixed.


#8

Next up on the rentier corporate agenda, criminalizing darning your socks.


#9

Duh, you aren’t licensed to make that copyrighted pattern, you are only licensed to wear the object you bought!!!1!!!

Liberals just don’t get finance.

/s


#10

It would seem that post-Trumpelection we are finding out just how many organisations think that they have the right to their own, special little bit of protectionist legislation. Expect more of this.

I just learned last week how to sharpen a chainsaw. I didn’t realise at the time that I was striking a blow for freedom, but it’s beginning to look like it.


#11

Zen and the Art of Paying a Corporation to Maintain Your Motorcycle


#12

Came to post “WWRPD” (What Would Robert Pirsig Do), but you beat me to it.


#13

Whenever I took my old bikes into the factory dealerships, they’d point-blank refuse to even attempt working on them…

Factory spanner-twirlers aren’t real mechanics, they’re just part-fitters. Okay to replace a tyre or do a routine service, but useless if there’s actual diagnostic or serious tuning work to be done. You need a good independent for that stuff.


#14

nah, like Barry Sheene, I did it all for the crumpet. :slight_smile:


#15

They can come get me. We have BMW motorcycles, and lots of ATVs. None of them have ever, or will ever be repaired at a dealership.


#16

criminalizing darning your socks.

You can get away with it if it’s at night and there’s nobody there. Father McKenzie gets away with it all the time - but he’s kinda lonely.


#17

Not when they start putting chips in socks. “Disconnect in fibers 312533, 312534, and 312535. Set elasticity to zero (falling down = true).”


#18

Yep. Or more then half, in the case of my Royal Enfield, Malaguti, & elderly Vespa


#19

Once these baby boomers start slowing down the supply of older bikes is going to flood the market like never before.

Problem solved.


#20

It ain’t gonna happen. If it does happen, the first lawsuit will be a class action against those very same industry groups.
Here’s the list of bad actors:
Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC)
Specialty Vehicle Institute of America (SVIA
Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association (ROHVA)

These are the clowns that think you do not deserve the right to repair your own property because, uh well, because we say so.
It’s not a new thing. If I remember correctly, there’s also an issue with agriculture equipment. If you pay +$100K for a harvester machine and it throws a belt or fries a control board, you now have to replace it by going to the manufacturer or risk losing any warranty you have, even if the machine is brand new.

I’m not even discussing the fact that you now own a worthless $100 thousand dollar machine without that $800 control board that failed because of a bad component that could be replaced for less than $3.50.