British shopping center creates Christmas tree out of Remembrance Day poppies


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/10/25/british-shopping-center-create.html


#2

I assume they paid for the poppies, in which case I’m fine with it.


#3

Showing “support for the Armed Forces Community” is a pretty distorted view of the meaning of Remembrance Day. The Royal British Legion should know better.


#4

True. But what exactly does it mean anymore? I mean, the literal meaning of remembering fallen WWI veterans seems a bit abstract after 100 years. Does it include more recent veterans?


#5

An unanticipated and shocking flanking maneuver in the War on Christmas.

Thanksgiving is long lost, but Armistice/Veterans’ Day wasn’t previously considered a front. We may need to resort to heavy artillery if we mean to defend Halloween.


#6

I don’t remember there being a UK theatre in the War on Christmas. They don’t even say “merry Christmas,”


#7

here’s one that appears to be made from a wide variety of potatoes

here’s one made from a single piece of some kind of plastic
image

what does it all mean?


#8

It does.

and

Starting at 11am, the service will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military and civilian servicemen and women involved in the two World Wars and later conflicts.


#9

That’s the Remembrance service, and I have no problem at all with that, but I do have slight concerns that the original purpose of the poppies has been lost. They’re supposed to commemorate all those lost in war, NOT solely British and Commonwealth personnel.


#10

I’m really glad you posted that.

That’s what I remembered but oddly enough I can’t find any reference to that ever actually being the case (or at least not any time during my lifetime).

Usage does change (and has changed in many ways as the wikipedia article shows) but as far as I can tell the poppy has always been solidly about Allied war dead.

The change in usage does mean that a major plot point of at least one mystery novel would no longer work at all.


#11

Yep, this is a little weird. Perhaps too weird.

I recall when this was a thing.



#12

I kind of agree in that it’s a bit tasteless (though only due to the context; the actual Christmas tree looks good, even if they’ve put it up about a month too early), but I wouldn’t go so far as call it disrespectful.


#13

I kind of agree with the veteran there. I’m surprised the Legion would make something like that. Looks like a bullet-riddled dog to me, definitely didn’t get poppies from that pic.


#14

My first thought was protest against baby seal ‘hunting’?


#15

Pretty sure “puppy riddled with bullets” wasn’t how it looked on paper. :grimacing:


#16

Internationally the poppies are more directly associated with Veterans. And the US equivilant holiday is Veteran’s Day. So its not exactly odd if the UK’s read has drifted closer to that.


#17

Of course what comes to my mind at the intersection of Christmas and WWI is either

or

https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/princess-mary-gift-fund-1914-box-and-contents


#18

This is why I don’t buy a poppy anymore. My grandad was a member of the Royal British Legion and would have hated what Remembrance Day has become.


#19

Ah, yes. the Buttplug suitable for a Titan. such a double entandre.


#20

I’d say it’s entirely deliberate.

By my feel of things it’s been over the last 15 years or so that the whole poppy thing has turned the jingoism up to 11.

It used to be that you would only wear the poppy on the actual Remembrance Day, now we’ve reached a point where we’re apparently expected to wear it from about early October onwards and we get into spats with FIFA about whether our national team will wear jerseys emblazoned with a poppy or not.