CBC warns Canadians: US cops will pull you over and steal your money


#1

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#2

I’m still not entirely sure how this has avoided being shut down due to the fact that it’s rather overtly unconstitutional. Illegal search and seizure, punishment without a trial and whatnot… You’d think the civil rights and constitutional lawyers would have ripped this entire thing to shreds.


#3

Well if they didn’t want to get robbed, what were they doing in the States in the first place?


#4

I really don’t understand why people are driving around with all their money? I seldom have more than the equivalent of $40 on me at any time, or do the cops bring like their credit card machine and suck people’s bank accounts dry too?


#5

Some people are uncomfortable with the security model or the business model of cash. Some just don’t trust banks. Some don’t consider it fair for the banks to get rich of their money and prefer keeping them offline.

Neither is illegal and neither should be even suspicious.


#6

Yeah, this has enraged and baffled me for decades, since it became common knowledge this was happening as part of the “war on drugs.” I’ve always assumed the practice would be terminated, with prejudice, since it’s so blatantly - blatantly! - in violation of the Fourth Amendment. So much rage.


#7

Since it doesn’t look like this form of (literal) highway robbery is going to stop any time soon, I want to see the phrase “Robbed at Badgepoint” so often in headlines that it becomes a cliche.


#8

Well, now that this insanely bad practice is being exposed…it’s high time for a counter surge of lawsuits to take the offending police departments to the woodsheds…and then to the cleaners to significantly lighten their budgets with compensatory and punitive fines. The more severe and painful the better. The US is just one constitutional step away from becoming a banana republic. Time to put a real leash on the cops.


#9

‘Protect’ and serve. In case youse have an ‘accident’.


#10

I learned about this back in the 90’s from a Dean Koontz… I mean Dean R. Koontz novel ‘Dark Rivers of the Heart’.

I seem to remember that there is even an epilogue or post novel piece in the back about Forfeiture, the staunchly negative tone seemed to suggest to me, at the time, that Dean might have fallen victim to this kind of crime. The book also has space lasers and serial killers, not bad. Or so my younger self remembers.


#11

I think I found your problem right here.


#12

don’t use breath/air freshener, they’re evidence of drug use

No, they’re really, really not.


#13

Do you need to?

My good ol’ boy father from Wyoming routinely traveled with $5,000 in his pocket. Why? Because he didn’t trust banks or want to write checks for everything (or use credit cards). Lots of parts of the country are still traditional and use cash for things.


#14

And yet the NSA still spies on us, citizens that are terrorism suspects are allowed to be killed overseas without a trial, and states and cities are trying their hardest to outlaw guns. Just another case of the constitution being ignored. Nothing new to see here. Move along.


#15

I don’t normally carry a lot of cash, but sometimes when I am travelling I will have several hundred dollars. This is probably especially true of foreign tourists who presumably don’t have US bank accounts and want to reduce the amount of transaction fees they have to pay. I have had to pay an apartment deposit / first month rent in cash which could be a few thousand dollars.

Not that it is relevant – the police robbing you of $40 is just as wrong as robbing $4000. It shouldn’t be tolerated, and is manifestly unconstitutional. Also, this report, informing foreigners visitors of the US criminal gangs known as cops is specific to travel, it doesn’t matter if you aren’t driving – the same can happen in your house. Some people have legitimate or paranoid reasons for stockpiling cash at their house, as is their right. You know what happens if someone down the street is running a grow house, but the cops get the wrong address? Assuming they don’t gun you down in your own house, they will steal everything of value as ‘evidence’ and you will never get it back.


#16

The other day I bought a Nissan Leaf for my spouse, and I put down several thousand in cash. It was easy and convenient - I sold a Honda CR-V, the buyer gave me cash, I took the cash to the Nissan dealer, and bought the Leaf. No waiting for checks to clear (or bounce) and no complications; everything managed in about an hour. Since I didn’t ever deposit the cash in the bank, the DEA did not tap my phone or surround my house with armed dragoons, etc… it was just simpler and more efficient to use cash. As it usually is, in my opinion.


#17

Not being a constitutional lawyer nor having had this happen to me, it’s not like I can do fuck all about it…


#18

Home Depot breach. US credit card transactions are finally being seen as completely insecure.


#19

…surround my house with armed dragoons…

Image of an Argonian holding a gun


#20

At home in Canada I rarely have more then $20 or 40 in my wallet. I pay for pretty much everything on my bank card. But when I’m in the US I frequently have a lot of cash… mostly to buy gas. Buying gas on a credit card in the US without a US zip code to go with it is a PITA. Worst in smaller towns where they don’t get many tourists and they look at you like you’ve just grown horns when you tell them that your postal code has letters in it and therefore can not be entered into a touch pad.