CBS Poll: support for legalizing marijuana is at an all-time high


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/04/20/cbs-poll-support-for-legaliz.html


#2

Not that it matters, unless Sessions can think of some other way to lock POC up for a bogus ‘crime’ in order to fill up private prisons and make them ‘non-voting felons.’


#3

With the post title:

Cheeky monkey.


#4

#5

The important poll number would be how many understand and are enraged by the dangers of unnecessary prohibition. Being ok with legalization is quite different from being un-ok with prohibition, when rubber hits the road.


#6

This is always the poop cherry on top of the sundae. If someone has an addiction and wants to get clean, by all means, I would like them to be able to get treatment. But if it’s not voluntary, it’s just a kindler, gentler version of jail. Diversionary treatment is perhaps better than jail, but it still grants the conceit that drug abuse is inherently wrong and that it’s the government’s job to “fix” you, a premise I refuse to grant.


#7

Alas, pot legalization supporters are concentrated in large, wealthy states whose populations count less in the electoral college.

Chances of abolishing the ATF and legalizing moonshine are higher.


#8

Canada is going to legalize and regulate it July 1st, 2018. Feel like there is a big opportunity being missed here and not just in weed, but industrial hemp, which I feel like is going to be the bigger cash crop (paper, textiles, oils etc.).


#9

an all-time high

Righteous!


#10

Oh Canada!


#11

It’s very weird living in a state where both medical and recreational pot have been legalized, yet the sale of such has not been approved by the state as of yet. Schrödinger’s Bong.


#12

It’s a rule for “journalists”; never, ever, ever write an article about pot without at least two double entendres or Cheetos references


#13

We had that in WA a few years ago. The “grey market” handled it just fine. As far as I could see, the state turned a blind eye to it. But then Seattle PD already had its “marijuana is lowest of priorities” policy in place so maybe that helped. I did notice that about a month before legal stores started opening up the grey market delivery services I was using switched to medical patient only.


#14

Medical legalization never really worked out here in Mass. – I think there’s maybe two or three distributors in the entire Boston area, three years after legalization, thanks to corruption and red tape and stupidity – and they’re pushing recreational sales out as far as they can. But it’s also decriminalized, so it’s not a priority. I’ve never known any ‘grey market’ dealers or sales so I’ll just check it out if the state ever figures itself out.


#15

Also, if it is not voluntary then the treatment has a far lower success rate.


#16

Isn’t the very term “drug abuse” granting that same conceit, though?

I don’t mean to be pedantic; I think it’s a very good question: Where does “drug use” end, and “drug abuse” begin? Depending on where that line is drawn, I think it might very well be the government’s job to “fix” you if you slide into drug “abuse.” Especially if you start posing a danger to others.

Of course, in many cases, the term “drug abuse” is used to mean any illegal/off-prescription drug use, which is ridiculous in itself.


#17

Beat me too it. Use does not equal abuse. I would even argue that abuse should not be enough to trigger a fix from the government. Actually be a danger to others, yes. But the government doesn’t step in for people that abuse food, or abuse TV or abuse exercise, etc.


#18

Legalization worked just fine in DC until the Congress decided they didn’t like the residents making that decision for themselves.


#19

I would modify that to “only if you actually cause harm to others”. Otherwise we’d be engaging in crime pre-cognition or thought-crime type stuff. And as you say, where the line is between use and abuse is not clear and society will never agree on that, and given the nefarious nature of our current drug laws I wouldn’t trust them even if they could agree. I always think people should first be given a chance to handle their own shit. If someone wants to have drugs instead of a job or a home or family or friends, that’s their business, until they steal or commit assault. I’m just not comfortable with the mob going around judging how much and what type of intoxication we’re allowed as individuals. It’s different for everyone. How do we know when a bright line is being crossed? When they commit a crime that has a victim.

And I just realized what day it is! Happy 4/20 y’all.


#20

The frustrating thing about living in a legal state with no legal sales is reading tweets/emails/etc from friends in Seattle, Colorado, and other spots just casually celebrating the day with various marijuana products. And, apart from one really weird experience with it about 15 years ago, I’ve never had much opportunity to try the stuff. Not that I’m super eager, but folks certainly seem to enjoy it, and I’ve got an innate curiosity, more than anything.