Cheap replacement center-pinch lens caps


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/11/29/cheap-replacement-center-pinch.html


#2

Yup, this is one camera accessory I’m not afraid to go cheap on. I don’t need my camera maker’s logo in bright letters on the front of the lens, and it can be a pain to replace an odd sized lens cap while on vacation, so I’ve traveled with a spare on occasion.


#3

I have considered finding a source for bags of 50.


#4

I get ones that say “Pentax,” which is even better than hanging a sign out to say “not worth your time.”


#5

Linkee no workee


#6

Fixed thanks.


#10

Here you go.


#11

Have you tried making friends with crows?

She often photographs the crows and other birds, and she lost her lens cap in a nearby alley a few weeks ago while photographing a bald eagle.

When she returned home, the lens cap was sitting on the edge of the birdbath.

Mann checked video from the surveillance camera she set up to record the birds and spotted a crow bringing the lens cap into the yard, walking it to the birdbath, and then rinsing it off.

“I’m sure that it was intentional,” she said. “They watch us all the time. I’m sure they knew I dropped it. I’m sure they decided they wanted to return it.”


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#12

Having lost, just last weekend, my…beloved…oh dear…Canon 5D 1st run (not the Mark 1 or 2 or whatever) full-frame boat anchor along with the 17-40mm L lens, both of which constituted my entire setup for the whole PCT hike and ever since…I wish I could be using the link to order a new cap for the 40mm (HFS I loved that lens).

Should I spring for a 1Ds Mark 3? The newest 5D looks great but I don’t shoot video. JFC I can’t believe that camera is gone. Woe is me.

I’ve done pretty well with lens caps as I got used to shooting with a small camera bag (I rarely carry an extra lens), and muscle memory has made me drop the lens cover in the bag prior to shooting, and then reach in for the cap when I’m done and in preparation to zip the bag shut. Gonna need a new wide-angle lens (sadness), and so an extra lens cap is in the mix as well.


#13

Condolences. FWIW I highly recommend the 6D, full frame at a much smaller price point and vastly improved focusing. Rent one for a few days and take it for a spin. The only issue I have is that the review button is in the wrong spot for 5D people.


#14

Renting is definitely the best course of action. There’s still a glimmer of hope that one of the cousins or aunts grabbed the bag by mistake and they’ve yet to find it in travel rush. But every day hope fades a little.

Balls.
I had Digital Rebel that I fairly wore out, and I liked that camera, too. But the 5D, man? My D?


#15

Are all your lenses Canon, or did this just clear you out?


#16

I hear you. I still have my 5Dii, even after it fell over in Arches last spring. I can’t convince myself to get rid of it or spend the $400 to fix it when you can get one used for $700.

jlw asks an excellent question. Might you be interested in a Fuji X series or is DSLR the only way forward for you? Nikon is also doing amazing things with low light capabilities.


#17

Two other Canon L lenses, the 24-105 f/4 and the older 200 f/4 (which is a ridiculously good, cheap lens). I’ve shot with Canon stuff that it’s probably one of the few brands that I’ll follow.

And let me add that the PCT hike was as big a confidence builder in a camera as I’ve ever had. Every environment there was–I slept, ate, or walked in it, and shot photos in it too, and that 5D just kept on going. Some dust got in, which I expected to a far larger degree, but never water, and it always returned what I was seeing. I’ve never dropped my cameras regularly, but the 5D got bumped here and there without complaint. Just a solid camera with great performance.

If I stepped up, I’d go medium format, but I don’t want to change formats right now and MF is a PITA to hike with. Weather sealing, strength in tough environments, full-frame, high MP rate–between hiking or riding m/c’s or doing shots in the city, the camera’s going to take a few jabs. Which is why I’m leaning to the larger bodies. But rent first before purchase.

First trump. Now the D. 2016? Faaaaaack you.


#18

Keep away from Fuji. I had an X-F1, which is an amazing little camera with excellent optics and very interesting/forgiving sensor technology, but when I started to get “lens control” errors I discovered that (a) this was a nearly universal problem with this camera, and (b) when you contact them Fuji denies they’ve ever heard of the problem, and won’t do a warranty repair. While any camera can be a dud, (b) is unacceptable, and speaks very badly for their customer service. I wouldn’t buy a Fuji again for that reason.


#19

I have enough invested in Nikon, with a few legendarily good lenses, that I can not credibly consider switching. I have tried Canon and find the UI to be totally unintuitive, so thats lucky! My underwater rig was Canon for a time. I think old film photographers will feel better with Nikon and folks who are deft digital editors may prefer canon. End of day, they both record the same light.


#20

I’d love to switch, one of my friends is the local Nikon rep and his club work at 128000 is just jaw dropping. But, I’m a little too tied to Canon lensing.


#21

How do the older Nikon lenses work on new cameras? I had Nikon SLRs in the pre-digital era, and have some old F-mount lenses I’m fond of.


#22

A pain to hike with?

Try taking one to the moon and then hiking, then you can complain.

Seriously though, I love my Hassy but I could never hike with it just because of the fact I’d have to bring a meter along and the weather sealing. I hike with it now in Maine, and I love it, but it’s always just day hike stuff, nothing long.

Definitely check the 6D though, the low light stuff is going to be a big jump for you. 6400 suddenly becomes useable:


#23

Great. I actually use an old Nikon tilt-shift with a converter on a Canon.