Chinese Cyberspace Administration bans news-sourcing from social media


#1

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#2

Or to put it in other words, the Chinese state has decided to retain its monopoly on the fabrication of news.

Which is not exactly news.


#3

So, question: does the original Chinese name of that Chinese government agency contain a Chinese prefix that no one else has been using for a decade, or are the translators engaging in subtle anti-PRC propaganda by deliberately using a term used only by old people and shady intelligence agencies in the West, thus making the “Cyberspace Administration” look even dumber than it is?


#4

At least it’ll keep viral media at bay!

Yes, I know the greater implications but I’d love to see less marketing PR, stunts, glorified email forwards (the Disney character LSD on grade school playgrounds “rainbow bracelets for sex acts” and kids getting high off MP3s style that still get reported as fact), outright hoaxes and fucking YouTube compilations presented as “news”.


#5

So, question: does the original Chinese name of that Chinese government agency contain a Chinese prefix that no one else has been using for a decade, or are the translators engaging in subtle anti-PRC propaganda by deliberately using a term used only by old people and shady intelligence agencies in the West, thus making the “Cyberspace Administration” look even dumber than it is?

You tell me.

http://www.cac.gov.cn/english/

(In the 1990s, I regularly read issues of Beijing News, not because of any real interest in Chinese affairs–though I am curious about such things–, but because the dialect of agitprop amused me.)


#6

how sad that China does not use political trolling, they should have called the office “Cybelspace Affails” in English


#7

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