Cool magic trick: The Perpetual Puzzle


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/02/27/cool-magic-trick-the-perpetua.html


#2

Great, not I’m craving an infinite chocolate bar.


#3

Not allowed to tell the solution, so I’m left dancing around it. At a few points, it was briefly obvious what was going on. Pay attention to the times he neatens up the layout.
This is actually a fairly well known illusion. Great presentation though.


#4

Puzzles in this family were really popular in the 19th century, many due to Sam Loyd (whose Cylopedia is still available and a great read for puzzle fans).


#5

Exactly! Whenever I see a puzzle like this, Sam Loyd is the first thing that comes to mind. Get Off The Earth was the first one I remember seeing/hearing about.


#6

It is fine to dance around it.


#7

It is intuitively obvious to the casual observer.

(What mathematicians say when they’re baffled.)


#8

They forgot to print on pictures of dwarfs that increase in number.


#9

This seemed familiar for some reason. :smiley: And it still hurts my brain.


#10

If you know, please don’t reveal the secret

Memo to self: Don’t say he’s a witch.


#11

I’ve seen other versions of the Freer style puzzle with a grid printed on it, which I thing makes it even more perplexing.


#12

“The rectangle fits snugly in a black plastic frame”

Does it?


#13

Just checked Martin Gardner’s Mathematics, Magic and Mystery, he traces these kinds of puzzles at least as far back as this one by William Hooper in 1794:
image
Here’s one of Gardner’s own creations, which is great because you can have young kids cut it out of graph paper for themselves then work out the mystery:
image
(Gardner calls these “Curry puzzles”, but I’ve heard mathematicians use the term “Fibonacci puzzles” because of how they work.)


#14

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.