Crooks rip off nonprofit rape crisis center, then return the stuff with an apology note


#1

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#2

Welcome to America, we may have horrible politicians and business leaders, but we're evolving a whole new class of criminals.


#3

The governor of Texas could learn something from these guys.


#4

The police admitted they'd never heard of thieves returning property. It seems counter to their intentions.

An astute observation. Not that I´d expect anything less from skilled investigators.


#5

The problem is that thieves are humans too, and the police don't view the world in human terms.


#6

That must have been an amazing moment! Somebody actually decided to break in and bring things back, despite it being VERY risky and unprofitable.

I want to catch whoever talked the group into going back, and I want to make them President.


#7

While I believe it's an urban legend there is a story of Mr. Rogers' car being stolen then returned when the thieves found out who it belonged to. It's nice to read about a confirmed case of this actually happening.


#8

In truth, thieves often do have at least some form of honor.

Look at regions of the world controlled by gangs and by organized crime. If such a group accidentally stole from a party they never intended to, they'd put it right. They wouldn't just say, "Oh well, screw that school/orphanage/hospital/daycare/et cetera, we're gonna keep the goods anyways". Likewise, if some outside group steals from such a victim in a place under the protection of a crime group? They're gonna go find the perpetrators, teach them a lesson, and take the stuff back. And naturally, the cops aren't gonna hear about it.


#9

This illustrates well the dual nature of people. No person is truly all bad or all good, despite what stories and personas they may project or our culture may assign to them. We all have 'good' and 'bad' traits and we express them differently and at different times. Our culture is so attuned to boxing someone in and naming them a criminal or a saint that there is little to no flexibility, despite evidence such as this, that shows evidence of the (darker, in this case) shades of gray.


#10

A better class of criminal, perhaps? Because that could go either way, really.

...or...


#11

Everyone has their own code of honor. Ripping off some for-profit company is totally different than ripping of a non-profit that helps rape victims.


#12

The first is pretty much even with Politicians and Captains of Industry.

The second is a huge improvement.

What have we done to ourselves?


#13

See what you did there?

Police are humans too!

Never dehumanize, admit your monkeysphere!


#14

I had someone steal some stuff from my house during a late-night New Years party a few decades ago. A couple days later, the stuff appeared on my front porch in a shopping bag. I was happy, and not too surprised... one of the things they stole was a car stereo that I had disassembled for installation in my '59 Caddy. A disassembled car stereo is hard to fence.


#15

The Train Job was my first thought too.

I'm not sure if I'm happy or sad that American thieves are more noble than their cops and politicians.


#16

Sounds great until you realize that they had unfettered physical access to the laptops for 24 hours. Hopefully there was no client information stored on them and they have the sense to destroy the hard drives and start from a known-good backup.


#17

Police are humans too!

Thanks GIR. It's been a long day, I needed a good laugh.


#18

Code of honor or no, that whiteboard is crawling with fingerprints, and burglary is still a crime. Now watch the judge throw the book at them because he thinks it's an abortion clinic.


#19

It was either that or the doom song!

doom doom doom. . doom de doom doom


#20

@2:05