Decorating a wall with a perfect, floor-to-ceiling replica of the opening of Harry Potter


#1

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#2

/gets all the way to the bottom of the wall before noticing the outlet


#3

I expected a movie set, and was kinda wondering who wanted to live at #4 Privet Drive.


#4

Might I suggest anyone wanting to replicate this is scan a page and then send it to a place that does vinyl signs. They could make you vinyl letters you could easily apply. Or you could typeset it yourself in Illustrator or Indesign.

Granted the painting method is cheaper (assuming you have access to a good projector).


#5

What if we have a bad projector? Does the Captain, under pressure from the Mayor, take away it’s gun and badge? Does it go after the drug lord anyway?


#6

I would recommend wallpapering with photo paper and projecting the inverse of the page image. Then just hose it down with the appropriate chemicals, and you’re set!


#7

I think you will end up with Parallax and the edges will get fuzzy and distorted. Also might try to re-write history to prevent a past tragedy. Depends on the brand.


#8

What? Paint doesn’t stick to wall outlet covers?


#9

The issue I could see there is that you still need to project it to get the kerning and other spacings right, plus painting sounds cooler when you tell people about it.


#10

There is great creative potential of a digital projector to transform physical spaces by relatively unpainterly folks like me. Here’s my project:


#11

Here’s the deal as far as sorting out the problems with both methods.

Yeah, doing a tracing of a scan of the book page, cutting the letters with vinyl, and applying them to the wall is a whole lot faster and much more accurate. And expensive. And not as . . . “artistic”.

But having used the whole projector process for many years as a way to throw an image on a wall for the purpose of sign-painting, there’s one terrifically frustrating aspect. Especially if you need to do this over the course of several days. You’d have to bolt that projector to the table, and bolt the table to the floor, and duct-tape the art to the projector board. Otherwise, the tiniest bit of movement will tweak the original projection and you NEVER get it back in alignment. You’d think it would be easy, but it’s virtually impossible. This young lady must have no kids, no cats or dogs, and stayed away from the other side of the room. Oh, and no earthquakes.


#12

Couldn’t you add a couple of small location marks on the original artwork, say top left and bottom right cross-hairs, and make those the first thing you painted? Then you have an ongoing visual check to see if everythings aligned and a way of relocating the image.


#13

I made registration marks on the wall with tape. IF anything got bumped, you’d adjust. As long as all four align, it’s going to match.


#14

Bingo. https://www.flickr.com/photos/46866170@N07/11427230936/in/album-72157638777696416/


#15

You don’t need a particularly good projector unless the space gets a lot of sunlight when you need to work. Resolution isn’t really an issue, parallax can be addressed by moving the projector (tripod helps) and brightness is manageable if you can make the space dark enough.


#16

Count me as completely impressed it only took three weekends. It took me one and a half weekends just to paint a bedroom one solid colour.


#17

OMG, do they really make this? I’ve long had such an idea with a special paint you could use a specific color light to develop a pattern onto.


#18

Thanks for taking a very obscure joke an interjecting some knowledge on projectors.


#19

…adding some transparency?


#20

She’s gonna’ need a bigger house.