Divorce & Porn Filters


#1

So how long until one of these is cited in a divorce case? “He opted out!”


#2

Has anyone tried using TOR/proxies/VPNs over a filtered connection yet? I remember reading about how this will ‘block circumvention methods’. My work has a BT home broadband connection. I will have to try it out…


#3

Won’t be long.


#4

I think the best way to open blocked content is by using hma or hss .
With those vpn i can open blocked content in my country such as betting site,london escorts agencies , poker games and more. I have tried using double vpn and still works.


#5

Don’t you guys have no-fault divorce over there?


#6

I’m sure they have. But divorces can be very messy, especially where custody issues are concerned. I can see arguments like ‘he’s been looking at porn on the internet, therefore he’s not fit to look after the kids’ and stuff like that.

(Edited for typos. Why do I get spellchecking when I ope bbs in Opera, but not in Firefox?)


#7

No-fault divorce only works when neither side has reason for wanting to assign fault… it’s an option, not a guarantee.


#8

Preface: IANAL and am only speaking theoretically and have no real knowledge of UK law.

But whose fault it is doesn’t matter for the purposes of division of property except in cases of adultery. Porn is not adultery. At least not legally (with the stipulation, as always, that I’m not familiar with all laws and all cases in all states and all countries at all times). In the US the standard for custody is “best interest of the child” not fault- I assume that it’s the same in the UK. The divorce could be indisputably your fault and it wouldn’t matter unless it was directly related to your ability to take care of a child. You could opt for a no-fault divorce and still bring up adultery in a custody dispute if it is relevant.

In this case there a number of plausible alternative reasons to disable the porn filter and as many have demonstrated, viewing porn is possible with it in place. Hence: I really, really, doubt it will have an impact by itself. Of course stranger things have happened, and family lawyers (at least where I live) have a reputation for being more tenacious and adversarial than any other breed.


#9

I know what you mean. I was really drawing out how these minor intrusions into privacy, as they multiply, will ultimately result in a mass of weapons levelled at the heads of individuals, to be divorced or not.

The kind of practical, rather than philosophical, side of the privacy discussion. How these things will actually be wielded, beyond the realms of the Snowdens, in ordinary, boring lives.

It struck me that divorce lawyers will immediately make it their business to add ‘porn filter?’ to their list of things to do, dirt to dig, and easy character tarnishing tasks.

Were I an eloquent lawyer, why I’d have ‘registered on BB - more than 10 posts?’ as a to do. Make hay out of that!


#10

Interesting: BT’s “parental controls” (because “break the internet” is a less-catchy title for what the crappy filter product does) – yesterday they included a “sex ed” class that had “respect for a partner” and “homosexual lifestyle”, blatantly illegal discrimination and a horrible throwback.

Today the wording has all changed and now it’s a lot more… almost apologetic. http://bt.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/46809/kw/parental

The block list are still secret of course, so you have to hope that Taliban Mode isn’t enabled by your grumpy old dad.


#11

Fucking hell. That’s the entire internet.


#12

I bet it still won’t block Page 3. Too much power.


#13

Where can I download a divorce filter? I don’t CARE who is and isn’t getting unmarried…


#14

Careful, they’re a bitch to configure. You can end up married by mistake if you don’t set the whitelist properly…


#15

This topic was automatically closed after 1157 days. New replies are no longer allowed.