Eviction epidemic: the racialized, weaponized homes of America's cities


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Pretty good article, but I don’t know why the topic had to be made out to be a race thing.

When my family owned a rental property, we hated having to evict, because you always lost money. Eventually the city made it too difficult to evict and otherwise made things difficult for landlords, so we sold.

Best part of the whole article was the end "if you ever thinking about becoming a landlord, don’t. It’s a bad deal. Get the short end of the stick every time.”


#3

Eviction in America, like a felony, is a life sentence. You NEVER get out from under it. It makes renting virtually impossible, even after decades. You will be lucky to settle for roach infested, over-priced, delapidated rentals, and the land lord will often STILL demand at least two EXTRA months of rent on top of first/last/deposit. If you have a felony (no matter the charge or how long ago) and an eviction (no matter the cause, your side of the story, or how long ago) this whole country shuts its doors to you indefinitely, especially if you are a person of color. We have a de facto caste system in America, meritocracy my ass.


#4

Because it is a race thing. Go read Ralph Ellison.

Also, isn’t the person on the short of the stick the now homeless person?


#5

Homes have been used as weapons against women of color since at least the late 1930s.

(Green does too count as a person of color!)


#6

“evictees are disproportionately single mothers of color.”

This isn’t new. In the 60’s & 70’s almost every Black child I went to school with families were evicted come the end of the school year, to make room for wealthy folks from the cities to sun their fannies / dowse their livers in booze at the Jersey Shore. The children’s trauma was compounded by missing end term finals as well resulting in shity grades.

Thusly I do not miss that place…


#7

It’s a rare situation where a landlord wants to evict a tenant. Much better to just not rent to risky tenants in the first place than to have to deal with the eviction process – thus checking credit history, eviction history, and using limited-duration leases.

I’m skeptical of the Jersey Shore seasonal eviction anecdote. Was it really that cheap and fast to get an eviction in the 1970s?

I lived in an area with a high number of summer rentals, where my lease was up at the end of the spring semester, non-renewable (because the landlord knew he could double the rent for the short-term “summer people” tenants).

So when my lease was up, you know what I did? I moved out.


#8

Simple, racism still dominant in society.


#9

Oh good, another housing thread. The richsplaining, will it ever stop?

no it will not


#10

I’m “skeptical” of your naive skeptical argument.


#11

Winner Winner Chicken Dinner!


#12

Not when profit takes the forefront. Try some objectivity, it may help to see the other person’s situation.


#13

What imaginary world do you live in where nobody pursues their own self interest? Even a socialistic system is made up of people gaming that system, not doing what’s best for others. There is no way to avoid people being selfish.


#14

I’m avoiding you right now.


#15

I’ve seen both sides of this, as the property owner and as a tenant.

Yes, profit is the motive of owning rental property. But as a landlord you don’t set yourself up in a situation where you know you will have to evict. Evictions cut into profit.

It’s not like summer comes as a surprise – the landlord knows summer is coming and he’ll want the apartment vacant before then, but you don’t achieve this by giving your fall tenant a full year lease and then finding an excuse to evict the lower-rent tenants as summer approaches, then repeating this scheme year after year. That’s not sustainable.

No, if you want to have the apartment free for summer vacation rentals you offer your fall tenants a short term non-renewable lease, and in the spring the lease ends, and the tenant, knowing the move-out date half a year in advance, has moved out by the lease end date, as required by their contract.

As a tenant, was I some sort of sucker by actually abiding by my lease terms instead of occupying the apartment after the contract ended and making the sheriff throw me out?


#16

I bet someone $1 that you are a landlord, I’m a buck up for the day, and thanks.


#17

The contrast between username and comment here couldn’t be more glaring. How can you live with any sort of ease when your interior house is so divided?


#18

Bingo!


#19

Because the horse goes in front of the cart. You’re welcome.


#20

his/her inner sucker has been evicted?

That thing you see everywhere. It’s you.