Facebook bans holocaust denial

Yeah, I reflected on that after I posted. But not condemning it until October 2020 is definitely pandering to the political whims instead of taking the strong, ethical path however little it might cost you in right-wing dollars. It’s literally the bare bones ethical stance you can take on fascism, Nazism, genocidal antisemitism.

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The whole point of the mockery is that any reasonable human can draw a line between advocating for, say fiscal conservatism and denying that a massive, excruciatingly recorded and dissected genocide didn’t happen. It’s not a “free speech” issue, it’s a hate speech issue. The gulf between the two is massive and totally obvious to anyone arguing in good faith.

ETA: The sarcasm is also a direct satire of how the ideals of free speech are distorted and manipulated to aid in the resurgence of ideals it was designed to eliminate. The primary reason this debate lingers is because malignant platforms like Facebook make far more money from hate speech than other forms of discourse.

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MAUs?

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Your concern is noted, as it has been with others before…

Monthly Active Users. The product Zuckerberg sells to his customers.

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Thanks. Added to the glossary

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Yup, the fact we’ve had to wait so long is atrocious.

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If FB can ban threats of violence, then logically they should ban Holocaust denial, because anyone who denies the Holocaust happened is really just itching for a chance to get another try at it.

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Additional note:

The new policy doesn’t apply to the denial of other genocides, such as the Armenian or Rwandan genocides – only the Holocaust, Facebook said.

[Source]

I guess Zuck was never on Usenet.

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The Freeze Peach howls on the right should be interesting.

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Mark Zuckerberg, 36, decides that having people on his website deny the deaths of six million Jews is a bad thing

[…]

It is possible other “data” contributed to the decision. Such as the recent Congressional report that argued for breaking up Facebook and highlighted its role in spreading misinformation as justification for bringing antitrust actions against the company.

Or polling “data” that shows Donald Trump is likely to lose the upcoming election and so lift political pressure on Facebook to not touch provably false or misleading statements. Another data point is growing legislative pressure to remove Section 230 legal protections from platforms like Facebook in response to its refusal to deal with rampant misinformation.

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The thing is, Facebook was already banning Holocaust denial…but only in countries where that was the law (eg Germany, Poland).
This wasn’t a complicated technical fix, it’s just something they only turn on for a particular country when it looks like they might save money/political capital.

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I believe the official position is that the Holocaust happened, was perpetrated by German invaders and the Poles had nothing to do with it.

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Ah yes, in the same way that several of my French pals have grandparents who were in La Resistance, but curiously it seems that none of the Vichy collaborators had grandchildren (who will admit to that fact)…

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That law is obviously bad, but it’s the direct result of German, and generally Western media trying to shift the blame for Holocaust to Poland.
It got so bad that Western mainstream media, like Vice, openly deny that holocaust was done by Germany:

Comparing Vichy France to territories of occupied Poland is dishonest. Look at the names of people who governed occupied Polish territory, they don’t sound Polish at all:



Polish government-in-exile resisted German occupation:


Of course there were atrocities like Jedwabne pogrom, but none was orchestrated by Polish government-in-exile:

Armia Krajowa, the military arm of Polish government-in-exile, helped rescue Jews, for example after Treblinka concentration camp uprising:

The first revolt occurred at Treblinka on 2 August 1943.[22] Prisoners used a duplicate key to open the camp arsenal and steal 20 to 25 rifles, 20 hand grenades, and several pistols. At 3:45 p.m., 700 Jews launched an attack on the camp’s SS guards and trawnikis that lasted for 30 minutes.[23] They set buildings and a fuel tanker ablaze. Armed Jews attacked the main gate, while others attempted to climb the fence. About 200 Jews escaped from the camp,[a][24][23] but the well-armed guards slaughtered hundreds of others.[25] They phoned for SS reinforcements from four towns, who set up roadblocks[23] and pursued escapees in cars and on horses. Only about 100 prisoners ultimately escaped. Partisans of the Armia Krajowa (Polish: Home Army) transported some of the surviving escaped prisoners across the Bug River,[26] while others were helped and fed by Polish villagers.[25] Of 700 Sonderkommando who took part in the revolt, 100 managed to survive the escape from the camp, and around 70 of these are known to have survived the war.[27] These include Richard Glazar, Chil Rajchman, Jankiel Wiernik, and Samuel Willenberg, who co-wrote the Treblinka Memoirs .[28]

And one more Wikipedia article:

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Do you mean the English empire @74hc595?
The Poland version has never trended in the US AFAIK.

The Holocaust is purely a Nazi Germany problem as far as I’m concerned. Was your country invaded?

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It’s a very recent narrative, like last 15 years, and mostly limited to German press. I linked the Vice article as an example, but most of articles like that are in German.

Maybe not purely, because there were collaborators in every occupied country, but definitely it was orchestrated by Nazi Germany. I’m just opposing the current shifting of the blame for Holocaust to Poland, because it’s counter-factual. There were whole units of Polish Home Army dedicated to eliminating the people who collaborated with Nazis.

Well, it’s hard to find a person here who haven’t had any relative murdered by Germans during WWII.

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