FBI arrests "Shadow Brokers" leak suspect charged with theft of NSA cyberweapons


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/10/05/another.html


#2

What is “was dated” supposed to mean? Time stamped? Whoring for dinners? Movie nights? or just old?


#3

Another Snowden? This doesn’t look one bit Snowdenic to me.


#4

So… he was arrested for doing on his own time the same thing he was doing for the NSA on the clock?


#5

Military Tribunal, that’s how you get that. Hasn’t worked out to well for the last few individuals, not one bit.


#6

Don’t worry. These zero days and backdoor exploits gathered by the NSA are safe. No way criminals can use them against the public…


#7

What you are seeing is endemic corruption on display. What is happening is those lower down in the food chain a dissatisfied with all the profits from corruption going to those at the top of the food chain, whilst those lower down are just expected to do all the stealing whilst just getting paid a typical shite wage.
So they are now taking matters into their own thieving hands. What with most of the war shite going on around the world, largely just being a lie to steal resources and sell weapons and their being no reality or value in it, it makes no difference when those lower down the food chain start stealing everything they can, crippling that activity.
When that activity had not real purpose other than to steal money from the US treasury, than if it all blows up in everyone’s face after too much was stolen, it makes no difference, it just means those lower down got to steal some for a change. Hence growing failures across the board. Reality is why Clinton, one and only one reason, guaranteed not to prosecute high crimes, the more you steal the safer you are, as long as they get a percentage.


#8

What’s important is responsible zero-day ownership.

The fact that criminals might use zero-days to hurt the general public is no reason to restrict use of these weapons by our responsible and ethical security services.


#9

I have to wonder what this guy was thinking.

Upsetting the feds for whistleblowing purposes requires a great deal of spine; but it’s an understandable motivation.

Upsetting the feds out of sincere allegiance to somebody else’s feds is similarly risky but understandable.

Doing it for money, though, seems weird. It’s not news that the intertubes are home to a thriving underground economy, much of which operates with effective impunity knocking over soft targets in bulk. That seems much more attractive than trifling with a rather sophisticated adversary with both a strong willingness to prosecute and plenty of things to charge you with.

Why pick what is among the harder available targets that is also in the best position to retaliate should you slip up even once?


#10

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