Federal court rules that air fresheners and pro-cop stickers are a reason to pull you over


#21

So they allow dice but not palm fronds? Shoulda pulled the old “persecuting Christians” routine. Why do you hate Christmas, officer?


#22

What you want is one of these babies - the thin blue line bumper sticker. Unfortunately, you can only get them through a cop.

:


#23

Or anyone who can do silkscreening, or perhaps even stencil spray painting.


#24

Wow this literally makes it easier for cops to steal than beg for money. Nobody is going to want those ‘I paid my protection money to the cops’ stickers anymore. So they will fund the margarita machines like they did in this case.


#25

How about the bumper sticker, “I’ll shoot you the moment you turn your back, you rabid pig-fucker.”


#26

Maybe a bumper sticker with the entire 4th amendment?


#27

BUT…


#28

Correction, the driver wasn’t sent to jail, her husband in the passenger seat was.


#29

“The officer did not find any drugs, but did find a large sum of cash that he confiscated, and then sent Ruben Pena-Gonzalez to jail.”

Because having both a spanish name and money is illegal?


#30

wow, this truly is the land of the free.


#31

PBA sticker means you’ve contributed to the “Policemen’s Benevolent Association”, or as we call those in New Jersey “Paid Bribe in Advance”. Supposedly they helped discourage police from hassling you, if you and your car looked respectable enough, though the real get-out-of-trouble card was business cards that cops handed out to their friends; you might only get to use it once if you weren’t in that cop’s home area or had done something really stupid.


#32

I had a friend at high school who turned to crime after we both left school, and eventually went to jail for murder. He used to put pro-police stickers on his car as a ploy to convince the police not to pull him over, but I reckon the police saw right through it.


#33

I’m pretty sure that the officer will check against your address to see if you really are related to a cop or not.


#34

When you know the laws (because you’ve actually read them) then there is less of a reason to spend the money to get an attorney anyway. Part of the big scam is getting people to believe that only a special class of people are capable of knowing the law, bringing suit, or defending you.


#35

So, I’ve heard of this cash stealing since around the time Jon Oliver covered it on his HBO show. Any chance whatsoever to get that changed?


#36

The old adage, sometimes attributed to Abraham Lincoln goes: "He who represents himself has a fool for a client.

It was written with people like you in mind :grinning:


#37

Sounds more memorable than insightful.

I gave up after a few instances of attorneys not knowing laws very well, and/or simply being uncooperative, or even deliberately asserting my presumed guilt to the court.

I don’t doubt that a competent attorney can be a powerful ally, but I caution against assuming that any attorney is automatically better than no attorney.

My point was for people to not let a lack of representation intimidate them into accepting unjust pleas.


#38

I can tell you from formal training that this is a very bad idea. Even attorneys don’t do this (often.)


#39

Are you willing to go into any detail as to why or how? Saying that something is a bad idea doesn’t tell me much.

Again, you are disregarding my point, which was that defending yourself is better than not being defended at all. If you are refused representation, the fact that it may be preferable is moot. Knowing the law is still a stronger position than agreeing to whatever they put in front of you.


#40

Kiddo, the cash stealing has been going on since the days of Reagan. It’s only gotten greater attention in the last few years as the end result of all that legal stealing has made itself evident in the form of MRAPs showing up in the local PD’s fleet.