Feds indict Florida police chief who framed a teen for burglaries so he could boast about perfect record


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/06/12/raimundo-atesiano.html


#2

florida

I realize he’ll probably get a slap on the wrist by some cop-sucking judge, but here’s hoping he gets some prison time.


#3

Naked ambition, depraved indifference to the suffering they conspired to create, and wanton disregard for the rule of law.

They’ll make perfect Republicans after they get out of prison.


#4

I wonder now if others have also been framed by the Biscayne Park Police Department; if they did it once…


#5

I’m sure that’s part of the argument defense attorneys will use when they file their appeals for any conviction where there wasn’t ironclad (like “we caught the defendant in the process of committing the crime”) evidence that the defendant was guilty. Hopefully the courts in that jurisdiction have empty dockets now; they’ll be quite full soon enough.


#6

Yeah, according to my brief and shallow Google research, the clearance rate for burglaries was around 13% for 2016.

Even 50% seems high unless you just have few burglaries in a small community and the criminals are idiots. And if that’s the case, it’s nothing to brag about.


#7

Christ, what American police officers.
(Anyone who objects to my equating “American police officers” with “assholes” should take it up with them.)

Even if they hadn’t done this particular thing before, they most certainly engaged in other kinds of unlawful and horrendously poor policing practices the resulted in arresting and convicting innocent people - this kind of action doesn’t come from nowhere.
Also, it’s an extreme example of a dynamic that’s almost universal with police* - the pressure (and interest) is in catching someone for a crime, not necessarily the actual perpetrator. Bad policing methods that are known to generate false identifications, forensic techniques that generate false matches, etc., are still rampant in the US for this reason.

*American police, certainly, but it’s probably more universal than that, even.


#8

“… an extreme example of a dynamic that’s almost universal with police* - the pressure (and interest) is in catching someone for a crime, not necessarily the actual perpetrator.”

In general, I believe the “catch 'em” dynamic is also driven by stupidity, laziness, and incompetence… not to mention racism and bigotry.

“American police, certainly, but it’s probably more universal than that, even.”

In my most humble opinion, certainly not probably. The US is certainly not alone when it comes to crooked cops and miscarriages of justice.


#9

Yeah, the dynamic exists because it allows police to give in to their prejudices (and desires to bully, etc.) and because there’s this pressure, from on high, to meet arbitrary quotas. I only question the complete universality of it because I know there are some countries making an effort to focus on proper, evidence-based policing procedures and consciously avoid the kind of dynamics that lead to this kind of behavior. (I’m not sure how effective any of them have been yet, though.)


#10

I was having a laugh, thinking about Trump pardoning this villain and appointing him attorney general… but then I realized that nothing, no matter how outlandishly evil or stupid, is impossible with Trump.


#11

I don’t think that any US president has the constitutional power to pardon crimes that violate state laws. Doesn’t mean Trump won’t flex his dictator muscles to see what gives.


#12

violate state laws

The article mentions the federal prosecutor, so I think it’s a federal case, not state. What I find interesting is that 11 years is way under what you or I would get for kidnapping someone. Seems fairly backwards considering the Chief abused his authority, misused the power of the state to kidnap someone, carried a gun during the commission of the crime, and the length of the kidnapping was a lot longer than the norm (depending on the kids sentence for burglary, none of the articles I found even mentioned if the kid was prosecuted, let alone served time).


#13

You’re right. Perhaps the feds get this one because state employees violated the law, and/or the nature of the crime being violation of “civil rights under color of law and deprivation of the 16-year-old’s civil rights”?


#14

The real surprise to me is that this prosecution is occurring with the Evil Keebler Elf at the helm of DOJ.


#15

This could be a total disaster. Every single case they touched should be suspect. And every conviction could be appealed.

Not only did these police officers betray the community’s trust. They likely have made a huge mess for the court system to clean up. Net effect is we’ll have to release a lot of guilty people to make sure we haven’t imprisoned innocent people. Luckily people who commit burglaries tend to be repeat offenders and we’ll be back in prison shortly after release.

alternative is we leave a bunch of innocent people in prison. which is closer to how things will really play out. It does imply we’re not a nation of laws and justice though.


#16

I love that phrase you created there. “Cop-sucker”. I am using that from now on to voice both my disgust of police and general hatred toward others without denigrating the gay community.

Honestly though, thats just a brilliant phrasology.

I also posit “judge fucker” for people that seemingly get away with anything for no reason in court, when its clear universally to every party involved they are scum sucking lying bastards.


#17

Whether it’s gone national or not, I believe there are people out there who don’t care if “certain people” are indeed innocent or not, and would rather see those “certain people” incarcerated (and even executed) just in case.


#18

Thanks, but I can’t take credit for the term. It’s been in circulation for a while…


#19

“Fairly Backward” is the name of the game. To have a chance at winning, you need to be a person of privilege; have power, money, light skin color, or a combination of those three. The more of each you have, the better your odds.

I’m just guessing, but that could be because he was a minor. He probably got sent to juvie if he wasn’t prosecuted as an adult. It’s probably also why they only refer to him as “T.D.”


#20

According to the article he was accused of using police funds to pay off a personal loan, but got off because he said the paper trail was just a joke. How Trumpian.

The real joke is calling these jokers “a few bad apples” and ignoring the effects that bad apples have on the whole bunch.