Find out why Nietzsche wasn't a fan of Socrates

Originally published at: Find out why Nietzsche wasn't a fan of Socrates | Boing Boing

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Find out why Nietzsche wasn’t a fan of Socrates

By watching yet another video? No thanks.

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Tl;dw: Socrates was off sides.

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“He was sentenced to death. I like people who weren’t sentenced to death. Socrates was a loser.”
– Friedrich Nietzsche

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There’s nothing Neitzche couldn’t teach ya 'bout the raising of the wrist.

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Socrates himself was permanently pissed…

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I believe that true answer may involve over imbibing.
:notes:
Immanuel Kant was a real pissant
Who was very rarely stable
Heidegger, Heidegger was a boozy beggar
Who could think you under the table

David Hume could out-consume
Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
And Wittgenstein was a beery swine
Who was just as sloshed as Schlegel

There’s nothing Nietzche couldn’t teach ya
’Bout the raising of the wrist
Socrates, himself, was permanently pissed

John Stuart Mill, of his own free will
On half a pint of shandy was particularly ill
Plato, they say, could stick it away
Half a crate of whiskey every day

Aristotle, Aristotle was a bugger for the bottle
Hobbes was fond of his dram
And René Descartes was a drunken fart
“I drink, therefore I am”

Yes, Socrates, himself, is particularly missed
A lovely little thinker
But a bugger when he’s pissed
:notes:

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This certainly would not work with Socrates quotes, that’s for sure.

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Ayn Rand is no more correct than Confucius

But definitely more of an asshole.
And her demise was a testament to the idiocy of her idea(l)s.

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And while it’s fun to engage in these debates as a layman, it’s even better when titans of the field disagree and offer critiques of each other.

Yeah, but not as much fun when the one you’re critiquing has been dead for a couple millennia and can’t retort. That’s not a debate, that’s a piss on a grave.

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Socrates didn’t kill pre-Socratic culture, so he only made it stronger.

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“You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound.” -Reginald Jeeves

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But usually he really did play a mean football.

(the music is extra annoying - sorry)

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Heads up: for improved credibility as to one’s association football familiarity, it’s ‘offside’.

Also:

Ayn Rand is no more correct than Confucius

…is hardly going to persuade me to watch a video about one philosopher’s views on another’s.

Also:

ETA Damn @newbrain beat me to it.

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The fact that we so often view philosophy this way is probably more cause than effect of the lack of measuring progress towards closing out, or at least narrowing down, some of the old big questions. Yes, there are different schools and styles of thought, but these happen against a backdrop of (1) knowing all the arguments that came before, and (2) increasing human knowledge in more-easily-grounded domains of knowledge (although even that is not really true, since historically what happens is that when something becomes measurable or known and understood, we stop calling it philosophy).

Socrates recognized, and popularized, the fact that just asking questions and doubting received stories was a valuable path to learning by identifying holes in understanding. Plato extended the idea to thinking about idealized versions of reality. Aristotle added… a whole lot, but also the basis of what would become formal logic. Those foundations were critical for us eventually getting to Boolean logic (and the basis of modern computing), as well as probability theory, statistics, and conditional probability (the fundamental mathematical laws of how to reason under uncertainty and improve your state of knowledge efficiently based on available evidence).

Don’t argue against Socrates, or Nietsche. That’s silly. Maybe useful for an undergrad class to build foundations of thinking, but otherwise silly. Instead, look at the path from Socrates’ questioning, to Aristotle’s syllogisms, to Descarte’s radical doubt on one hand and Hegelian dialectic reasoning on the other, to Popper and Kuhn on why science even works at all, as well as to Hilbert, Quine, Goedel, Turing, Shannon, and others on the limits of what things are knowable even in principle.

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"Football is a game for rough girls, not suitable for delicate boys" Oscar Wilde

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:rofl::rofl::rofl:Fair enough.

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No, she was most definitely wrong about everything.

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I think that, for many people who claim to follow Rand, it is worth garbling Nietzsche, “That which doesn’t destroy you is probably made up; because you are always projecting.”

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Whatever, horse puncher.