First-ever Tor node in a Canadian library


#1

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#2

Tor node

Must be French speaking Canada. In English we spell it T-O-R-N-A-D-O.


#3

This is Vanderbilt University’s Eskind Biomedical Library. I’ve occasionally wondered whether all that glass was a good idea. Of course when it was first built the idea of a tornado touching down in the area was ridiculous, but I worked in a building less than half a mile away and will never forget 1998 when I watched a tornado form from the office windows.


#4

No kidding. I love a library with an open feel and lots of natural light, but that’s not much protection in the event of any number of natural disasters.


#5

It’s not really about the open feel. It’s about initial cost. Those glass walls are now far cheaper to build than using traditional materials.

They’re building glass-wall condo towers here in Winnipeg, advertising to the gullible that somehow this is a Really Good Feature. Even the bedrooms have full-width floor-to-ceiling glass walls facing the local office towers. The name “Glasshouse” for one of the towers should be a hint.

In Toronto where they’ve had them for a while - in much milder weather conditions - condo residents in a couple buildings have all had to pitch in to have their towers re-clad at enormous expense. The krypton and argon and whatever they put between the panes to control temperature only lasts for a few years. The seals between the massive panes start leaking after a few years because their sheer size means that they get pushed and flexed more.

But they have lower up-front cost, and that’s all that people look at when the building is still just a PowerPoint presentation.


#6

That is AMAZING advice / knowledge!


#7

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