Free speech versus "compelled attention"


#1

[Read the post]


#2

ah! The gator warcry. Help! I’m being censored!


#3

Free speech means making other people say what I want them to say! #germergoat


#4

On the other hand, the same approach gave us the free speech zones.

So the answer is probably somewhere in between.


#5


#6

How is that the same as… anything at all? I don’t see the analogy. Free-speech zones are like blocking somebody on Twitter?


#7

If you’ve been blocked more than five times sentiment analysis or bayseian classification (with the source data being blocked messages) should be done on subsequent messages. If they match for messages sent to other users they should be autoblocked.


#8

Given that twitter has only lately reached the block-by-CSV-file, the blockfile via heuristic analysis is probably down the road a bit.


#9


#10

Free speech zones are the government blocking people not on Twitter, but at events like the Democratic National Convention. And they’re blocking people not just from contacting the government, but from making their opinions known to other people physically present at the location of the event, which they would ordinarily do by protesting at the event.

“Free speech zones” are not universally a bad thing; imagine a group of GamerGaters protesting/disrupting a convention on women in games. Having the police designate a place where their protesting won’t ruin the convention for the attendees would be pretty much the exact equivalent of blocking them on Twitter.

I guess it boils down to power differentials. In most democracies, we consider our the right to compel the government’s attention to be part of our free speech rights. The whole “right to protest” that is often considered a vital part of democracy is a (limited) right to “compel the public’s attention”. It does not, however, extend to a right to compel an individuals attention, and in most countries there are plenty of limits on the “right to protest”.


#11

Sounds a lot like “Freedom of Religion” :wink:


#12

I’m not a believer that the government is the sole enforcer of all censorship (Cf. Our shrinking Internet economies, DMCA take-down requests, and the hierarchies that subject us all to a restricted band of ideas) but the idea that any group, or that any individual is compelled to listen or to respond is in advocacy of a form of forced servitude.


#13

On a lot of campuses, it goes the other way, a tactic I find reprehensible.


#14

Ah, but in your cited case, blockfile via text document works…at least on the forehead. This requires more study, methinks.


#15

I fail to get your meaning at the moment, I’m probably missing some context.


#16

I guess I see putting my fingers in my ears as completely different from taping your mouth shut.


#17

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